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Ch 21: History Alive America's Past Chapter 21: The Civil War

About This Chapter

The Civil War chapter of this TCI History Alive America's Past Companion Course helps students learn the essential lessons associated with the Civil War. Each of these simple and fun video lessons is about five minutes long and is sequenced to align with the Civil War textbook chapter.

How It Works:

  • Identify the lessons in the History Alive Civil War chapter with which you need help.
  • Find the corresponding video lessons with this companion course chapter.
  • Watch fun videos that cover the Civil War topics you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

Students will learn:

  • The leadership of the Confederacy
  • Advantages the North and South had
  • Turning points of the Civil War
  • When the Civil War ended
  • The Civil War's economic, cultural and human costs

History Alive is a registered trademark of TCI, which is not affiliated with Study.com.

6 Lessons in Chapter 21: History Alive America's Past Chapter 21: The Civil War
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Creation of the Confederacy: Leadership & Goals

1. The Creation of the Confederacy: Leadership & Goals

In this lesson, we will take a look at the 1861 creation of the Confederate States of America. We will examine the new country's government, meet its leaders, and learn about its goals.

Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

2. Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

At the outbreak of the American Civil War, both the North and South believed the conflict would be over quickly. But advantages for both the Confederacy and the Union meant a prolonged war between the states. In this lesson, discover some of the advantages that the North and South had.

Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

3. Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

In 1863, three events proved to be turning points for the American Civil War: the Battle of Chancellorsville, the Battle of Gettysburg and the Siege of Vicksburg. Learn about these Civil War turning points in this lesson.

End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

4. End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

President Lincoln took a gamble and named Ulysses S. Grant as General-in-Chief of the Union army. They devised a plan to finally take Richmond and win the war in 1864. In this lesson, learn about General Grant's controversial tactics.

Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

5. Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

Two of the most eventful weeks in American history took place between April 1 and April 15, 1865, during which Richmond (the capital of the Confederacy) fell, General Lee surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse and President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated.

The Costs of the Civil War: Human, Economic & Cultural

6. The Costs of the Civil War: Human, Economic & Cultural

This lesson will explore the costs of the Civil War. We will examine the economic costs of the four-year conflict; its cultural costs, especially in the South; and its human costs, particularly casualties and veterans' post-war experiences.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the TCI History Alive America's Past: Online Textbook Help course

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