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Ch 1: History of American Law Lesson Plans

About This Chapter

The History of American Law chapter of this course is designed to help you plan and teach the development of American common law in your classroom. The video lessons, quizzes, and transcripts can easily be adapted to provide your lesson plans with engaging and dynamic educational content. Make planning your course easier by using our syllabus as a guide.

Weekly Syllabus

Below is a sample breakdown of the History of American Law chapter into a 5-day school week. Based on the pace of your course, you may need to adapt the lesson plan to fit your needs.

Day Topics Key Terms and Concepts Covered
Monday Origins of American law English common law and the contributions of Sir William Blackstone
Tuesday Business law overview Legal specialties relevant to the establishment and operation of a business
Wednesday The development of American law Components of the U.S. Constitution and legal developments following the end of the Revolutionary War
Thursday Stare decisis doctrine Legal precedent and the obligation of courts to consider previous rulings
Friday Early American government The Articles of Confederation, the Northwest Ordinance, the Constitutional Convention, and the Great Compromise

6 Lessons in Chapter 1: History of American Law Lesson Plans
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
American Law: History & Origins from English Common Law

1. American Law: History & Origins from English Common Law

Our modern American law system is based on centuries of English principles regarding right and wrong. This English common law system combines with U.S. case decisions and statutes to form what we know as law. This lesson examines the origins and definitions associated with the American law system.

What Is Business Law? - Definition & Overview

2. What Is Business Law? - Definition & Overview

Business law is a broad area of law. It covers many different types of laws and many different topics. This lesson explains generally what business law is and how it's used.

Development of American Law After the American Revolution

3. Development of American Law After the American Revolution

The patriot movement and American Revolution generated the democratic government known in the United States today. This lesson discusses the process of creating the new nation through innovative laws.

Stare Decisis Doctrine: Definition & Example Cases

4. Stare Decisis Doctrine: Definition & Example Cases

The doctrines of stare decisis and precedent are the foundations of our American common law system. This lesson explains what these doctrines are and how they are used.

The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

5. The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

The Articles of Confederation was the new nation's founding document, but the government established under the Articles was too weak. The new central government had no way of raising revenue and no ability to enforce the commitments made by the states. The Northwest Ordinance paved the way for the growth of the new nation.

The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

6. The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

The Constitutional Convention was intended to amend the Articles of Confederation. Instead, those in attendance set out to found a republic (the likes of which had never been seen), which is still going strong well over 200 years later. To accomplish this task, compromises had to be made. The Great Compromise designed the bicameral congress the U.S. has today.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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