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Ch 19: History of Our World Chapter 19: Revolutions

About This Chapter

The Revolutions chapter of this Prentice Hall History of Our World Textbook Companion Course helps students learn the essential lessons associated with revolutions. Each of these simple and fun video lessons is about five minutes long and is sequenced to align with the Revolutions textbook chapter.

How It Works:

  • Identify the lessons in the Prentice Hall Revolutions chapter with which you need help.
  • Find the corresponding video lessons with this companion course chapter.
  • Watch fun videos that cover the revolutions topics you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

Chapter Topics

You'll learn all of the history topics covered in the textbook chapter, including:

  • History of the Enlightenment
  • Beliefs of Enlightenment thinkers
  • Major themes of the Enlightenment
  • Causes and effects of the Scientific Revolution
  • Chemistry and medicine breakthroughs
  • Start of the American Revolution
  • The Declaration of Independence
  • American Patriots and British Loyalists
  • Economic and social effects of the American Revolution
  • Causes of the French Revolution
  • Rise and fall of Napoleon Bonaparte and his empire
  • The Congress of Vienna
  • The First Industrial Revolution, including its social ramifications and inventions
  • American industrialization and the factory system

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19 Lessons in Chapter 19: History of Our World Chapter 19: Revolutions
The Roots of the Enlightenment

1. The Roots of the Enlightenment

In this lesson, we will learn about the roots of the Enlightenment. We will learn when and how the Enlightenment began, and we will identify the central themes associated with its beginning.

The Enlightenment Thinkers & Their Ideas

2. The Enlightenment Thinkers & Their Ideas

In this lesson, we discuss the varied and diverse 18th-century intellectual movement known as the Enlightenment. In addition to exploring its background and nature, we highlight several of the era's chief philosophers and their ideas.

Major Themes of the Enlightenment: Reason, Individualism & Skepticism

3. Major Themes of the Enlightenment: Reason, Individualism & Skepticism

In this lesson, we will identify the major themes associated with the Enlightenment. We will also explore the major figures and learn about their contributions. We will understand the lasting impact of the Enlightenment by putting it in historical context.

The Scientific Revolution: Definition, History, Causes & Leaders

4. The Scientific Revolution: Definition, History, Causes & Leaders

In this lesson we explore the Scientific Revolution and the controversy which surrounds the very term. Additionally, we learn about just a few of the most important thinkers of the period who laid the foundation for our modern understanding of the world.

Breakthroughs in Medicine & Chemistry: Examples & Empiricism

5. Breakthroughs in Medicine & Chemistry: Examples & Empiricism

In this lesson, we explore the medical and chemical breakthroughs which occurred in the 16th and 17th centuries as part of the era's increased emphasis on empiricism and the concurring Scientific Revolution.

Effects of the Scientific Revolution

6. Effects of the Scientific Revolution

In this lesson, we explore the philosophical, religious, and cultural effects of the Scientific Revolution on Early Modern society - effects that forever changed the Western view of the universe and humanity's place within it.

Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

7. Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

Following the Boston Tea Party, Massachusetts was placed under the command of the British army. Rumors of a rebellion led to an attempted raid on the militia's arsenal. The events that followed at Lexington and Concord touched off the American Revolution.

The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

8. The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

After 12 years of tension and fighting, the colonists and their leaders were ready to declare themselves a new country, independent of Great Britain. This lesson examines the motives, the text, and the legacy of America's Declaration of Independence.

British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

9. British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

In this lesson, learn about the difficult decisions faced by individuals as the American Revolution erupted. Would you have been a Loyalist or a Patriot? Are you sure about that?

American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

10. American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

Learn about the impact of the Revolutionary War throughout the world, especially on various segments of American society. We'll look at political, social, and economic impacts.

The Causes of the French Revolution: Economic & Social Conditions

11. The Causes of the French Revolution: Economic & Social Conditions

In this lesson, we explore the social, economic, and political conditions in late 18th-century France, out of which the French Revolution exploded in 1789.

The French Revolution: Timeline & Major Events

12. The French Revolution: Timeline & Major Events

In this lesson, we will learn about the French Revolution. We will examine the causes of the French Revolution and highlight the key themes and events associated with it.

Napoleon Bonaparte: Rise to Power and Early Reforms

13. Napoleon Bonaparte: Rise to Power and Early Reforms

In this lesson, we explore the rise to power of one of France's greatest rulers, Napoleon Bonaparte, and his subsequent achievements during the first few years of his rule up until he was crowned Emperor in 1804.

The Napoleonic Empire: Military & Economic Expansion

14. The Napoleonic Empire: Military & Economic Expansion

In this lesson, we explore the French Empire under the Emperor Napoleon I, from Napoleon's coronation as emperor in 1804 until the fateful invasion of Russia in 1812.

The Fall of Napoleon & the Congress of Vienna: Definition & Results

15. The Fall of Napoleon & the Congress of Vienna: Definition & Results

In this lesson, we explore the fall of Napoleon's French Empire after his fateful decision to invade Russia in 1812. In turn, we also discuss the Congress of Vienna that convened after Napoleon's defeat and attempted to plan post-Napoleonic Europe.

Causes of the First Industrial Revolution: Examples & Summary

16. Causes of the First Industrial Revolution: Examples & Summary

The Industrial Revolution was a period when new sources of energy, such as coal and steam, were used to power new machines designed to reduce human labor and increase production. The move to a more industrial society would forever change the face of labor.

Urbanization & Other Effects of the Industrial Revolution: Social & Economic Impacts

17. Urbanization & Other Effects of the Industrial Revolution: Social & Economic Impacts

The Industrial Revolution had a lasting effect on class structure, urbanization and lifestyle. In this lesson, we will learn how the Industrial Revolution changed various aspects of European society.

Inventions of the Industrial Revolution: Examples & Summary

18. Inventions of the Industrial Revolution: Examples & Summary

Although many factors influenced the first Industrial Revolution, the progress made by several inventors was essential. In this lesson, learn about the innovators who helped to spur the Industrial Revolution forward.

American Industrialization: Factory System and Market Revolution

19. American Industrialization: Factory System and Market Revolution

New agricultural technology revolutionized the North, South and West. In this lesson, learn how that technology ushered in the Market Revolution in America.

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