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Ch 14: Holt United States History Chapter 14: New Movements in America (1815-1850)

About This Chapter

The New Movements in America (1815-1850) chapter of this Holt United States History Online Textbook Help course helps students learn the essential United States history lessons of antebellum America. Each of these simple and fun video lessons is about five minutes long and is sequenced to align with the New Movements in America (1815-1850) textbook chapter.

How It Works:

  • Identify the lessons in Holt United States History's The New Movements in America (1815-1850) chapter with which you need help.
  • Find the corresponding video lessons within this companion course chapter.
  • Watch fun videos that cover the antebellum America topics you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

Students Will Learn:

  • Immigration and economic expansion in the early 19th century
  • Urbanization problems in the North
  • Transcendentalism, romanticism, and realism
  • Social reform and the Second Great Awakening
  • Education throughout early American history
  • Notable figures of the Abolitionist Movement
  • The rise of women's rights

Holt United States History is a registered trademark of Holt, Rinehart and Winston, which is not affiliated with Study.com.

9 Lessons in Chapter 14: Holt United States History Chapter 14: New Movements in America (1815-1850)
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Economic Expansion in the 1800s: Slavery, Immigration & Corporations

1. Economic Expansion in the 1800s: Slavery, Immigration & Corporations

Find out how and why America's population grew tremendously in the first part of the 1800s. Then, learn how America became a market economy and added new transportation routes.

Problems of Urbanization and Daily Life in the North

2. Problems of Urbanization and Daily Life in the North

In the antebellum years, American cities grew. Find out why and what it was like to live in New York, Philadelphia and other Northern cities in the middle of the 19th century.

Transcendentalism: Impact on American Literature

3. Transcendentalism: Impact on American Literature

This video defines Transcendentalism, a literary movement of the mid-19th century. Authors such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Walt Whitman used their literary platforms to encourage Americans to transcend society's presumptions and create a personal, progressive relationship with spirituality and nature.

The Dark Romantics in American Literature

4. The Dark Romantics in American Literature

This video introduces the characteristics of Dark Romanticism, a movement at the end of the Romantic period where literature embodied creepy symbols, horrific themes, and explored the psychological effects of guilt and sin. Authors, such as Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, wrote short stories, poems, and novels that encouraged Americans to see evil in everything.

The Literary Realism Movement: A Response to Romanticism

5. The Literary Realism Movement: A Response to Romanticism

In this lesson, we will learn about Realism in American literature, how this new literary movement grew out of Romanticism and what circumstances in our changing nation made that literary shift possible.

Reform Movements of the 19th Century

6. Reform Movements of the 19th Century

Inspired by the Second Great Awakening and Transcendentalism, Americans started a number of social reform movements in the antebellum era, including the fight against alcohol and slavery, as well as the fight for public schools, humane prisons and asylums, and women's rights.

Education in Early America: Birth of Public Schools and Universities

7. Education in Early America: Birth of Public Schools and Universities

During the early and mid-1800s, education reformers pushed to establish free public schools throughout the U.S. Their efforts also led to the establishment of American universities and the first generation of American writers.

Abolitionist Movement: Important Figures in the Fight to End Slavery

8. Abolitionist Movement: Important Figures in the Fight to End Slavery

The abolitionist movement spanned decades. Although slavery did not end peacefully, great Americans like William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Beecher Stowe were some of the driving forces behind the anti-slavery movement.

Advancement for Women: Education, Employment & Rights

9. Advancement for Women: Education, Employment & Rights

In this lesson, we will take a look at the advancement of women's rights during the 19th and early 20th centuries. We'll learn about the key events and themes surrounding the 'first wave' of the feminist movement and see how they impacted society.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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