Ch 5: Holt United States History Chapter 5: Forming a Government (1777-1791)

About This Chapter

The Forming a Government (1777-1791) chapter of this Holt United States History Online Textbook Help course helps students learn the essential United States history lessons of the early U.S. government. Each of these simple and fun video lessons is about five minutes long and is sequenced to align with the Forming a Government (1777-1791) textbook chapter.

How it works:

  • Identify the lessons in Holt United States History's Forming a Government (1777-1791) chapter with which you need help.
  • Find the corresponding video lessons within this companion course chapter.
  • Watch fun videos that cover the early U.S. government topics you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

Students will learn:

  • State constitutions
  • The Articles of the Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance
  • After the war: social and economic effects
  • Weaknesses in the new government and Shay's Rebellion
  • The Constitutional Convention: compromises, plans and ratification
  • Federalism in the new democracy: federalists and anti-federalists
  • The founding principles of the new American government

Holt United States History is a registered trademark of Holt, Rinehart and Winston, which is not affiliated with Study.com.

8 Lessons in Chapter 5: Holt United States History Chapter 5: Forming a Government (1777-1791)
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Creating State Constitutions After the American Revolution

1. Creating State Constitutions After the American Revolution

After the revolution, the states had to figure out what the rule of the people would be like. The early state constitutions and how they were drafted would inform the process and the resulting document that would become the U.S. Constitution.

The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

2. The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

The Articles of Confederation was the new nation's founding document, but the government established under the Articles was too weak. The new central government had no way of raising revenue and no ability to enforce the commitments made by the states. The Northwest Ordinance paved the way for the growth of the new nation.

American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

3. American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

Learn about the impact of the Revolutionary War throughout the world, especially on various segments of American society. We'll look at political, social, and economic impacts.

Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion

4. Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion

The Articles of Confederation were too weak to create an effective government for the new nation. In this lesson, discover how Shays' Rebellion proved that the national government needed to strengthen.

The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

5. The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

The Constitutional Convention was intended to amend the Articles of Confederation. Instead, those in attendance set out to found a republic (the likes of which had never been seen), which is still going strong well over 200 years later. To accomplish this task, compromises had to be made. The Great Compromise designed the bicameral congress the U.S. has today.

What is Federalism? - Definition & Factors of U.S. Adoption

6. What is Federalism? - Definition & Factors of U.S. Adoption

The United States government is based on federalism, with governmental power divided between several entities. This lesson explores federalism and explains the factors that led to its use in the U.S.

The Core Principles of American Government

7. The Core Principles of American Government

In this lesson, we will examine a few of the core principles of American government. We will pay special attention to the ideas of popular sovereignty, limited government, separation of powers, checks and balances, and federalism.

The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

8. The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

The U.S. Constitution may be one of the most important documents in history, but it wasn't a sure thing. A lot of debate took place. There were many people passionate about ratification, and many people passionate about ensuring it didn't get ratified. The divide over the Constitution shows us the root of political parties in the U.S.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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