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Ch 4: Ideas from the Renaissance - MTEL Political Science/Political Philosophy

About This Chapter

Examine this chapter to prepare for the MTEL Political Science/ Political Philosophy exam by learning more about ideas developed during the Renaissance. These lessons will address significant leaders, thinkers, and writings from this time period about which the exam may test your knowledge.

Ideas from the Renaissance: MTEL Political Science/ Political Philosophy - Chapter Summary

This chapter aims to strengthen your understanding of the contributions made by Renaissance philosophers as part of your studies for the MTEL Political Science/ Political Philosophy exam. Philosophers, events, and works detailed in these lessons include:

  • Thomas More and Utopia
  • The Italian Wars and Machiavelli
  • Significant works of and differences between John Locke and Thomas Hobbes
  • Summary of Petition of Right of 1628
  • English Bill of Rights

You will be led through these video lessons by an expert instructor whose aim is to present the information clearly and creatively. In addition to viewing the lessons, you may also read their full transcripts, which allow you to review the information at your own pace and take note of highlighted key words. After studying each lesson, put your knowledge to the test by taking the short self-assessments.

Ideas from the Renaissance: MTEL Political Science/ Political Philosophy- Chapter Objectives

Before attaining your license to teach political science and political philosophy courses in Massachusetts, you must pass the MTEL Political Science/ Political Philosophy exam. On the test you will find 18-20 multiple-choice questions meant to assess your understanding of political philosophy, including that developed during the Renaissance. Additionally, one of the open-response questions may ask you about the significance of political philosophers from this time period. As such, studying the lessons in this chapter will provide you with ample information to directly prepare you for any related questions the exam may ask.

A careful study of the chapter and taking the practice tests should help improve your confidence in your knowledge of political philosophy of the Renaissance in preparation for the MTEL Political Science/ Political Philosophy exam.

7 Lessons in Chapter 4: Ideas from the Renaissance - MTEL Political Science/Political Philosophy
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Utopia by Thomas More: Summary & Analysis

1. Utopia by Thomas More: Summary & Analysis

In this lesson, you'll learn about Thomas More's 'Utopia' and learn why living in a perfect world was desirable in 16th-century Europe. Quiz yourself to see how well you did!

Machiavelli and Lessons of the Italian Wars

2. Machiavelli and Lessons of the Italian Wars

This lesson focuses on Machiavelli and his views on governing, specifically pertaining to the actions of rulers. It will also highlight the actions of several countries involved in the Italian Wars of the 15th and 16th centuries.

Thomas Hobbes: Absolutism, Politics & Famous Works

3. Thomas Hobbes: Absolutism, Politics & Famous Works

In this lesson, we discuss one the key political theorists of the 17th century, the Englishman Thomas Hobbes, whose theories concerning absolutism, the basis of government, and human nature still resonate to this day.

Two Treatises Of Government by Locke: Summary & Explanation

4. Two Treatises Of Government by Locke: Summary & Explanation

John Locke's ideas about government and human nature became the starting point for modern political theory and, ultimately, the American Revolution. Locke's concepts of freedom, law, and the purpose of government were foundational to the modern conception of democracy.

Thomas Hobbes & John Locke: Political Theories & Competing Views

5. Thomas Hobbes & John Locke: Political Theories & Competing Views

In this lesson, we discuss the two premier English political theorists of the 17th century: Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. We'll also take a look at their impact on Western philosophy in contemporary and modern times.

Petition of Right of 1628: Definition & Summary

6. Petition of Right of 1628: Definition & Summary

The Petition of Right of 1628 was an English document that helped promote the civil rights of the subjects of King Charles I. Learn how the actions of this king led the people to stand up for and insist upon their civil rights in a manner that is still having influence today.

What Is the English Bill Of Rights? - Definition, Summary & History

7. What Is the English Bill Of Rights? - Definition, Summary & History

In this lesson, we will learn about the English Bill of Rights. We will take a closer look at why the document was created, what the document represents and the influence it has had on the U.S. Constitution.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the MTEL Political Science/Political Philosophy (48): Practice & Study Guide course

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