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Ch 8: Identifying & Planning for Students with Individualized Education Plans

About This Chapter

Prepare for an important test with help from this chapter on identifying and planning for students with individualized education plans. In these learning materials, you'll find bite-sized, interesting video and text lessons and helpful self-assessment quizzes for your flexible review.

Identifying & Planning for Students with Individualized Education Plans - Chapter Summary

Studying the processes for identifying and planning for students with individualized education plans is easy with help from the lessons you'll find here. They cover such topics as the purpose and function of an individualized education plan (IEP) and the similarities and differences between an IEP and an IFSP. You should be ready to do the following once you've finished this chapter:

  • Outline the components of a legally defensible IEP
  • Give examples of measurable goals as they're used in an IEP
  • Discuss ways in which an IEP can include parental input
  • Use an IEP successfully in the classroom
  • Differentiate between modification and accommodation
  • Explain the benefits of a least restrictive environment
  • Define the inclusive classroom and implement the strategies used therein
  • Identify the resources for national, state and district education standards

If you've struggled with these topics, take your time and work through these lessons at your own pace. Each one has been carefully written by a professional instructor to help you master these concepts quickly and easily. We've also provided a short quiz with each lesson and a chapter test to ensure you understand the important concepts presented to you. Along the way, feel free to reach out to an instructor with any questions that you have.

10 Lessons in Chapter 8: Identifying & Planning for Students with Individualized Education Plans
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Individualized Education Plan (IEP): Function, Purpose & Guidelines

1. Individualized Education Plan (IEP): Function, Purpose & Guidelines

The Individualized Education Plan is a critical document for children who receive special education services. In this video, we will take a brief look at the development and function of this important document.

IFSP vs. IEP: Similarities & Differences

2. IFSP vs. IEP: Similarities & Differences

This lesson is designed to define and explain the differences and similarities between an individual family service plan (IFSP) and an individualized education program (IEP), including the different scenarios under which children and students may qualify.

Components of a Legally-Defensible Individualized Education Program

3. Components of a Legally-Defensible Individualized Education Program

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act requires that each Individualized Education Program contain certain elements. This lesson summarizes the essential components of a legally defensible IEP.

Measurable Goals in an IEP: Examples & Definition

4. Measurable Goals in an IEP: Examples & Definition

Explore the world of the Individual Education Program, including the definition, the writing of measurable goals, and an example of an IEP goal. A definition of the plan and the individuals involved in its creation are discussed. Three areas of focus for drafting goals as well as the way in which goals are determined are areas of focus.

Incorporating Parental Input in Individualized Education Programs

5. Incorporating Parental Input in Individualized Education Programs

When developing a students' Individual Education Program, or IEP, educators must consider parental feedback. This lesson describes methods of involving parents in the IEP process and gives examples of ways teachers can foster parental involvement.

Using an Individual Education Program (IEP) in the Classroom

6. Using an Individual Education Program (IEP) in the Classroom

In this lesson, we will explore what an Individual Education Program (IEP) is and the three key components of an IEP. We will also discuss who needs an IEP and who does not.

Accommodation vs. Modification: Definition & Examples

7. Accommodation vs. Modification: Definition & Examples

This lesson discusses the instructional practices of accommodation and modification within the context of Section 504 Plans and Individualized Education Programs. Additionally, several examples of each practice are provided.

Least Restrictive Environment: Benefits & Examples

8. Least Restrictive Environment: Benefits & Examples

Teachers are required to find the least restrictive environment for students with disabilities. In most cases, there are a lot of pieces to this puzzle, and each student has a unique set of needs. Let's take a look at an example and some of the benefits of least restrictive environments.

Inclusive Classroom: Definition, Strategies & Environment

9. Inclusive Classroom: Definition, Strategies & Environment

Creating and maintaining a successful inclusive classroom requires much thought and collaboration. This lesson will introduce the concept of inclusive classrooms and how you can make your classroom successful for inclusion.

Resources for District, State & National Education Standards

10. Resources for District, State & National Education Standards

District, state and national education standards are used to guide instruction and ensure students are developing the content area knowledge and critical-thinking skills needed to succeed after they graduate. Learn more about education standards used at the district, state and national levels, and find out where you can access resources for each.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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