Ch 1: Informational Texts & Citing Textual Evidence: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.1

About This Chapter

Use this chapter to teach your 11th and 12th grade students methods for drawing inferences, interpreting generalizations, and developing conclusions. Video lessons and quizzes are aligned with this Common Core literacy standard for informational texts.

Standard: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.1).

About This Chapter

Students who reach this standard should be able to use context clues to decipher the meaning of an informational text. They should also be able to back up any claims about what the text says by citing relevant supporting details. Help your students meet these objectives with lessons showing them how to:

  • Understand the characteristics of nonfiction
  • Identify different types of informational writing
  • Distinguish fact from informed opinion
  • Recognize various persuasion techniques
  • Draw inferences from a written passage
  • Interpret a text's generalizations
  • Draw conclusions from a passage
  • Use textual evidence to support claims

Once students have a firm grasp of this standard, they'll be able to analyze a variety of informational texts, including essays, autobiographies, and editorials. They can also use the skills they've learned to take a closer look at other types of writing.

How to Use These Lessons in Your Classroom

Compare and Contrast Texts

After watching videos on the types of informational writing, ask your students to compare and contrast one of the informational texts you've been reading in class with a work of fiction or poetry from the same period.

Have Students Create Brief Presentations

Watch the video lesson on persuasion, fact, and informed opinion. Assign students to groups and present them with a relevant issue. Ask them to develop a stance on the issue, choose a persuasion technique, and present their argument to the rest of the class.

Supplement Homework Assignments

Send students links to video lessons and quizzes on conclusions, generalizations, and inferences so they'll have resources available to help them with the next day's reading assignment.

12 Lessons in Chapter 1: Informational Texts & Citing Textual Evidence: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.1
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What Is Nonfiction? - Definition & Examples

1. What Is Nonfiction? - Definition & Examples

There are a wide variety of genres of literature, but most can be separated into two categories. Watch this video lesson to learn about one of those categories: nonfiction.

Information Writing: Definition, Style & Examples

2. Information Writing: Definition, Style & Examples

Most of us encounter examples of information writing every day. Learn what information writing is, and see some examples to help ground your understanding of this writing genre.

Informational Writing: Types & Samples

3. Informational Writing: Types & Samples

In this lesson, we will define informational writing, examine the purpose of this type of writing and explore the features of different kinds of informational texts.

Fact vs. Persuasion vs. Informed Opinion in Nonfiction

4. Fact vs. Persuasion vs. Informed Opinion in Nonfiction

How do you know what to believe and what to doubt? Watch this video lesson to learn how to differentiate between facts, persuasion, and informed opinions.

Literary Nonfiction: Essays, Diaries, Letters, & More

5. Literary Nonfiction: Essays, Diaries, Letters, & More

Watch this video lesson to explore the world of literary nonfiction. You will learn the similarities and differences between journals, diaries, memoirs and much more.

Literary Nonfiction: Biographies & Autobiographies

6. Literary Nonfiction: Biographies & Autobiographies

Literary nonfiction consists of many types of writing. Two of the most popular types are biographies and autobiographies. Watch this video lesson to learn more about these two types.

Informational Text: Editorials, Articles, Speeches & More

7. Informational Text: Editorials, Articles, Speeches & More

Informational nonfiction is a large category that includes various types of writing. Learn about two of those types, articles and speeches, in this video lesson.

Business Documents: Policies, Procedure Manuals & More

8. Business Documents: Policies, Procedure Manuals & More

While letters and memos may be purpose written for businesses, plenty of other documents are used as well. In this lesson we'll take a look at policies, procedure manuals, and employee training programs.

What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

9. What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

In this lesson, we will define the terms inference and intended meaning. We will then discuss what steps to take when making inferences in literature.

How to Draw Conclusions from a Passage

10. How to Draw Conclusions from a Passage

You might be able to understand everything the author says in a passage, but can you figure out what the author ISN'T saying? Try your hand at drawing conclusions - but not jumping to conclusions - in this video lesson.

How to Interpret Generalizations of a Passage

11. How to Interpret Generalizations of a Passage

Do you know what a generalization is? Do you know how to spot a misleading generalization when you see one, or make generalizations about different aspects of a passage? Watch this video lesson to gain or improve skills.

Citing Textual Evidence to Support Analysis of the Text

12. Citing Textual Evidence to Support Analysis of the Text

This lesson will discuss what textual evidence is and why it is important to use it when analyzing a text. We will also discuss ways to cite textual evidence when analyzing a text to better support your claims.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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