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Ch 10: Inorganic Chemistry

About This Chapter

The video lessons in this chapter make inorganic chemistry simple and fun to learn. Expert instructors are only a click away to help with any questions you may have. Check out the quizzes following each lesson and the chapter exam to see if you understand the material you set out to learn.

Inorganic Chemistry - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

Inorganic chemistry is the study of chemical bonds that make up inorganic (non-living) material. Everything you see around you that isn't alive is made up of inorganic molecules. The chair you're sitting in, the pencil you write with, the TV you watch, the clothes you wear and the water you drink are all made of molecules from the periodic table. Inorganic chemistry studies these molecules and the bonds between them. Each lesson is brief and easy to navigate and followed by a short multiple-choice quiz for self-assessment. Contact our subject-matter experts if you have any questions as you go through the lessons, in which you will learn things like:

  • What kind of bond keeps the elements of table salt together and what can disrupt those bonds
  • What Halloween Glo sticks, firecrackers and CO2 transport in the circulatory system have in common
  • How human blood acts as a buffer in chemical reactions
  • How to write balanced chemical equations

Lesson Objective
Chemical Bonds I: Covalent Learn how electrons and electron sharing affect atoms.
Chemical Bonds II: Ionic Identify components and examples of ionic bonds.
Chemical Bonds III: Polar Covalent Differentiate between polar and nonpolar bonds.
Chemical Bonds IV: Hydrogen Explain how hydrogen bonding determines the behavior of water.
How to Write and Balance Chemical Reactions Demonstrate how to write balanced chemical equations representing reactions of chemical equilibrium and differentiate between exergonic and endergonic reactions.
Redox (Oxidation-Reduction) Reactions: Definitions and Examples Recognize when atoms are oxidizing or reducing and explain how electrons are transferred in each of these types of reactions.
Hydrolysis and Dehydration: Definitions & Examples Summarize how water is involved in building and breaking down molecules.
What Are Ionic Compounds? - Definition, Examples & Reactions Define and recognize ionic compounds.
Anabolism and Catabolism: Definitions & Examples Give examples of the metabolic processes of anabolism and catabolism.
Acids and Bases Identify acids and bases by use of a pH scale.
Weak Acids, Weak Bases and Buffers Recognize weak acids, weak bases and buffers and understand how they interact with their conjugates.

11 Lessons in Chapter 10: Inorganic Chemistry
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Chemical Bonds I: Covalent

1. Chemical Bonds I: Covalent

Mom always said that sharing is caring. This lesson will explore how electrons affect the chemical reactivity of atoms and specifically the merits of sharing electrons.

Chemical Bonds II: Ionic

2. Chemical Bonds II: Ionic

Did you know that the scientific name for table salt is sodium chloride? Find out how sodium and chlorine atoms come together to form your favorite seasoning.

Chemical Bonds III: Polar Covalent

3. Chemical Bonds III: Polar Covalent

Are you confused about how you can tell what kind of bond two atoms will form? This lesson will help you understand the difference between polar and nonpolar covalent bonds as well as how to predict how two atoms will interact.

Chemical Bonds IV: Hydrogen

4. Chemical Bonds IV: Hydrogen

This lesson defines and discusses important concepts behind hydrogen bonding. You'll learn when and why these bonds occur and which atoms are often involved.

Basic Properties of Chemical Reactions

5. Basic Properties of Chemical Reactions

Learn how about the various components of a chemical reaction, and how those components function. Use this lesson to understand the basic properties of different kinds of chemical reactions.

Redox (Oxidation-Reduction) Reactions: Definitions and Examples

6. Redox (Oxidation-Reduction) Reactions: Definitions and Examples

This short video will explain oxidation-reduction reactions, or redox reactions for short. The focus is on how electrons are transferred during redox reactions. Learn some neat mnemonic devices to help you remember when an atom is oxidizing or reducing.

Hydrolysis and Dehydration: Definitions & Examples

7. Hydrolysis and Dehydration: Definitions & Examples

Water is an important component of cellular processes. Two of these processes, dehydration and hydrolysis, help your body build large molecules from small ones and break down large ones into usable components.

What Are Ionic Compounds? - Definition, Examples & Reactions

8. What Are Ionic Compounds? - Definition, Examples & Reactions

Ionic compounds are a common, yet special type of chemical compound. In this video lesson, you will learn about their formation and structure and see examples of compounds formed by ions.

Anabolism and Catabolism: Definitions & Examples

9. Anabolism and Catabolism: Definitions & Examples

Metabolism breaks down large molecules like food into usable energy. This energy drives bodily processes critical to survival. In this video lesson, you will learn about the two forms of metabolism that break down and build up molecules and see examples of each.

Acids and Bases

10. Acids and Bases

Have you ever wondered how we measure the acidity of liquids? Check out this lesson to see how acids and bases are measured on a pH scale and how they relate to neutral solutions, such as water.

Weak Acids, Weak Bases, and Buffers

11. Weak Acids, Weak Bases, and Buffers

This lesson covers both strong and weak acids and bases, using human blood as an example for the discussion. Other concepts discussed included conjugate acids and bases, the acidity constant, and buffer systems within the blood.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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