Ch 8: Instruction Set Architecture

About This Chapter

Quickly finish your homework or get caught up in class using this chapter on instruction set architecture. Professional instructors created these lessons to ensure you have access to mobile-friendly and easy-to-understand learning materials accessible 24/7.

Instruction Set Architecture - Chapter Summary

In this chapter, you'll find concise lessons explaining instruction set architecture for your review on any mobile device or computer. Just a few of the topics presented here include the instruction set of a processor, creating an assembly language using an instruction set and the definition and formats of endianness. Even if you've struggled with these topics before, these expertly created lessons make them easy to understand as you work at your own pace. Help from an instructor is just a few clicks away in the Dashboard if you need it. Once you complete this chapter, you should be able to do the following:

  • Explain how the number of operands of an instruction set affects the assembly language
  • Give examples of basic computer architecture instruction types
  • Identify different types of addressing modes
  • Differentiate between hardwired control and microprogramming
  • Provide examples of instruction set architectures
  • Outline the pros and cons of RISC and CISC
  • Detail the function and design of an arithmetic logic unit (ALU)
  • Define central processing unit (CPU, its parts and function
  • Discuss the practical applications for instruction set architecture

12 Lessons in Chapter 8: Instruction Set Architecture
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Instruction Set of a Processor: Definition & Components

1. Instruction Set of a Processor: Definition & Components

In this lesson, you will learn how an instruction set is used to communicate with a processor of a computer. We will discuss instructions, operations and operands, and basics of assembly language

Creating an Assembly Language Using an Instruction Set

2. Creating an Assembly Language Using an Instruction Set

An ALU is capable of executing several instructions or different operations, otherwise known as an instruction set. In addition, it includes different functional units, each having its inputs and its outputs. In this lesson, we will see how these different outputs are connected to one output of the ALU, and learn how this leads to machine code and assembly language creation.

Endianness: Definition, Formats & Examples

3. Endianness: Definition, Formats & Examples

Endianness refers to the storage order multi-byte words in memory. There are two possibilities of Endianness; little Endian and Big Endian. In this lesson, we will take a look at both options and how this option affects the design of a processor and its importance on writing assembly language programs.

How the Number Operands of an Instruction Set Affects the Assembly Language

4. How the Number Operands of an Instruction Set Affects the Assembly Language

When you design the instruction set of a processor, you need to make important decisions. Some decisions may make your hardware design complex, but they will simplify the ability to write programs for it. Other decisions may make for a simple hardware design, but create complex programming. In this lesson, we will take a look at the effect the number of machine instruction operands has on the complexity of an assembly program.

Basic Computer Architecture Instruction Types: Functions & Examples

5. Basic Computer Architecture Instruction Types: Functions & Examples

This lesson examines bit manipulation, data manipulation and the functions of computer processes. It will explore how computers process input and output data and how it travels from the CPU to bus to register and then back again.

Addressing Modes: Definition, Types & Examples

6. Addressing Modes: Definition, Types & Examples

In this lesson, we define what an addressing mode is in computer architecture and identify several different addressing modes. Additionally, we demonstrate how an operand would be fetched in each of the addressing modes.

Microprogramming vs. Hardwired Control

7. Microprogramming vs. Hardwired Control

In this lesson, you will learn how microprogramming and hardwired control sets are designed in computer architecture. You will be able to describe their advantages and disadvantages and provide examples of each.

Examples of Instruction Set Architectures

8. Examples of Instruction Set Architectures

In this lesson we will discuss the main types of instruction sets that are the basis of modern computer architectures, learn their properties, and show how the instructions are affected by addressing modes and encoding length.

RISC vs. CISC: Characteristics, Pros & Cons

9. RISC vs. CISC: Characteristics, Pros & Cons

In this lesson we will examine what RISC and CISC processors are. We will understand their characteristics and highlight their advantages and disadvantages.

Arithmetic Logic Unit (ALU): Definition, Design & Function

10. Arithmetic Logic Unit (ALU): Definition, Design & Function

An arithmetic logic unit (ALU) represents the fundamental building block of the central processing unit of a computer. An ALU is a digital circuit used to perform arithmetic and logic operations.

Central Processing Unit (CPU): Parts, Definition & Function

11. Central Processing Unit (CPU): Parts, Definition & Function

The central processing unit (CPU) is the brain of your computer. It handles all the instructions you give your computer, and the faster it does this, the better. Learn about how a CPU processes instructions and how computer engineers are continuously coming up with ways to make it go faster.

Practical Application for Computer Architecture: Instruction Set Architecture

12. Practical Application for Computer Architecture: Instruction Set Architecture

In this practical application lesson, you will write code at the machine level. You will develop, run, test, and debug instruction sets in assembly language.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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