Ch 8: Instructional Strategies

About This Chapter

Learn multiple strategies for educating students with special needs. Get information on applying Bloom's taxonomy, using advanced organizers and taking advantage of assistive technology.

Instructional Strategies - Chapter Summary

The lessons in this chapter cover various strategies educators can use in their classroom to help special needs students. Our instructors will explain the concepts of direct, discovery and differentiated instruction and show how to apply Bloom's taxonomy for assessments. Other lessons cover cooperative and collaborative learning and expository approaches to instruction.

You'll learn how assistive technology can help your students, and review a lesson on universal design and its role in special education. By the end of this chapter, you'll be prepared to:

  • Define expository, hands-on, collaborative and interactive instructional strategies
  • Explain how teachers can differentiate instruction
  • Identify the six levels of Bloom's taxonomy
  • Discuss peer-mediated instruction and peer tutoring as well as the utilization of peer confederates for behavior management
  • Describe considerations used for selecting supplementary and functional curriculum
  • Give examples of assistive technology that can help students in the classroom

These video and text lessons are taught by instructors who are professionals in the field and who know how to make learning fun. Each lesson includes a written transcript that has important terms and phases highlighted. Some link to text lessons with more information. At the end of the lesson, you can assess your knowledge through multiple-choice questions. If you need extra review on specific topics, video tags will take you right back to that point in the lesson.

12 Lessons in Chapter 8: Instructional Strategies
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Educating Students with Special Needs

1. Educating Students with Special Needs

In this lesson, we will explore how to educate students with special needs. We will specifically address how the educational needs of these students are best served if they are in a mainstream classroom being taught alongside their peers.

Instructional Strategies: Hands-On, Interactive, Expository & Collaborative

2. Instructional Strategies: Hands-On, Interactive, Expository & Collaborative

In this lesson, we will use the fictional Academy of Magic to illustrate four types of instructional strategies that teachers use in the classroom: expository instruction, interactive instruction, hands-on instruction and collaborative instruction.

Direct Instruction & Discovery Instruction: Definition & Differences

3. Direct Instruction & Discovery Instruction: Definition & Differences

Two of the most popular teaching strategies are direct instruction and discovery instruction, which are frequently discussed in contrast with each other. In this lesson, we define each type of instruction and discuss the differences between the two.

Differentiated Instruction: Adapting the Learning Environment for Students

4. Differentiated Instruction: Adapting the Learning Environment for Students

Differentiated instruction is a great strategy that teachers use to accommodate a wide variety of learning needs. In this lesson, we discuss differentiated instruction and identify which aspects of the classroom can be differentiated.

Cooperative and Collaborative Learning in the Classroom

5. Cooperative and Collaborative Learning in the Classroom

It's extremely common for teachers to require students to work in groups. However, certain types of groups and activities are preferred over others. In this lesson, we define cooperative learning and discuss its advantages in the classroom. We also define collaborative learning and explain how it is different than cooperative learning.

Expository Approaches to Instruction

6. Expository Approaches to Instruction

Good expository instruction goes beyond just giving information to students. In this lesson, we describe effective expository instruction and how it is used to structure lessons in a way that optimizes learning.

Peer-Mediated Instruction & Behavior Management

7. Peer-Mediated Instruction & Behavior Management

In this lesson we will learn about peer-mediated instruction and behavior management and how they are used. We will also learn the steps used to implement peer mediation in the classroom.

Supplementary & Functional Curriculum: Selection & Implementation

8. Supplementary & Functional Curriculum: Selection & Implementation

Students with disabilities may benefit from adaptations to the traditional curricula. This lesson will discuss the selection and implementation of supplementary and functional curriculum in special education.

Pros and Cons of Homework

9. Pros and Cons of Homework

Homework is a hot topic in education. There are both pros and cons to assigning homework. This lesson outlines some of the major arguments both for and against homework. A short quiz follows the lesson.

Use of Universal Design in Special Education

10. Use of Universal Design in Special Education

Universal design strives to meet the unique needs of many different types of students. This lesson will discuss the use of universal design in special education and will end with a brief quiz to see what you have learned.

How to Select Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum

11. How to Select Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum

Choosing material that is both age and skill-level appropriate can be tricky for any teacher. This lesson explains the concept behind selecting appropriate curriculum and shares methods of determining levels.

Instructional Strategies for the Maintenance & Generalization of Concepts

12. Instructional Strategies for the Maintenance & Generalization of Concepts

You can help your students make progress toward independence as you teach them to perform skills in a variety of settings over time. In this lesson, we'll discuss some suggestions for including maintenance and generalization in your instruction.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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