Ch 7: Intentional Tort Law

About This Chapter

Feel confident in your understanding of intentional tort law by exploring the entertaining video lessons in this short chapter. Take mini quizzes and a practice exam to check your knowledge of this type of law and enhance your ability to earn course credit or excel on an upcoming test.

Intentional Tort Law - Chapter Summary

Explore our informative examination of intentional tort law to boost your knowledge of topics like battery, assault and nuisance. Our instructors present bite-sized lessons in an engaging fashion that ensures you fully understand these topics. The multiple-choice quizzes can gauge your comprehension of individual lessons, while our practice exam tests your knowledge of the entire chapter. The Dashboard tracks your progress and lets you submit lesson topic questions to our experts. Once you've taken advantage of these study resources, you will be ready to:

  • Define and provide examples of tort law
  • Compare and contrast battery and assault
  • Share the meaning of transferred intent for assault and battery
  • Give examples of intentional infliction of emotional distress
  • List elements of intentional torts of economic relations
  • Provide the definition and examples of trespass, conversion and nuisance
  • Identify and describe defenses to intentional torts to avoid liability

8 Lessons in Chapter 7: Intentional Tort Law
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What Is Tort Law? - Definition and Examples

1. What Is Tort Law? - Definition and Examples

A tort is simply a civil wrong. There are three general types of torts that may cause injury to another person. In civil law, torts are grounds for lawsuits to compensate a grieving party for any damages or injuries suffered.

Battery: The Elements of an Intentional Tort

2. Battery: The Elements of an Intentional Tort

The tort of battery occurs when a person intentionally inflicts bodily harm to another. While it generally involves some form of offensive contact that results in injury, the tort elements expanded to include contact that does not result in any physical harm.

What Is Assault? - Definition of an Intentional Tort

3. What Is Assault? - Definition of an Intentional Tort

Assault is a tort and occurs when one person intentionally places anther in a state of fear. There are three types of assault: simple assault, assault and battery and aggravated assault. Each type of assault is intended to instill fear and may even involve physical pain against another person.

Transferred Intent for Assault and Battery

4. Transferred Intent for Assault and Battery

Transferred intent is a shift from an intended action against one party, to an action against another, and there does not need to be intent. It applies to any of the intentional torts, including trespass to land, trespass to chattels, assault, battery, and false imprisonment.

Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress: Definition and Examples

5. Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress: Definition and Examples

When one party does something so harmful to another that it causes severe emotional trauma and the act was intentional and reckless, the injured party may have a tort action for intentional infliction of emotional distress.

Intentional Torts of Economic Relations: Definition and Elements

6. Intentional Torts of Economic Relations: Definition and Elements

Economic relations torts affect three categories of interference or injury that result in monetary loss. They are injurious falsehood, interference with contractual relations and interference with prospective advantage.

Trespass, Conversion and Nuisance: Definition and Examples

7. Trespass, Conversion and Nuisance: Definition and Examples

Trespass, conversion and nuisance refer to three intentional torts that deal with the taking of, use or interference of one's rights to hold and keep one's property or things. These are purposeful acts and considered tortious behavior.

Defenses to Intentional Torts to Avoid Liability

8. Defenses to Intentional Torts to Avoid Liability

An intentional tort is committed when a defendant interferes with another person's rights. There are times when a defendant can successfully mitigate liability by using one of several affirmative defenses.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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