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Ch 1: Introduction to Advanced Criminal Law

About This Chapter

This online study guide chapter provides a high-level introduction to advanced criminal law. Review these lessons and quizzes at any time to learn new criminal law concepts, study for an upcoming exam, complete homework assignments and more.

Introduction to Advanced Criminal Law - Chapter Summary

For an introduction to advanced criminal law, simply watch this chapter's informative and engaging video lessons. As you work through the chapter material, you'll familiarize yourself with sources of law, criminal procedures, the model penal code, the criminal sentencing process and much more. Included in the chapter are short quizzes to help you reinforce your comprehension of the lesson topics. Study whenever you have free time, and don't hesitate to use the Ask the Expert feature if you have any questions. When you're finished working through the chapter, you should be able to:

  • Identify the American legal system's sources of law
  • Define the stare decisis doctrine
  • Evaluate rules for criminal procedures
  • Describe the model penal code
  • Evaluate examples of mala in se
  • Compare types of contemporary criminal sentences

8 Lessons in Chapter 1: Introduction to Advanced Criminal Law
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Advanced Criminal Law: Concepts & Differences with Civil Law

1. Advanced Criminal Law: Concepts & Differences with Civil Law

The U.S. justice system is actually two separate systems; criminal law and civil law. In this lesson, we will learn both the concepts of criminal and civil law and the differences between the two.

Sources of Law in the American Legal System

2. Sources of Law in the American Legal System

The rules that govern society come from a number of places. This lesson will cover the sources of law in the American legal system. A short quiz will follow the lesson to check your understanding.

Stare Decisis Doctrine: Definition & Example Cases

3. Stare Decisis Doctrine: Definition & Example Cases

The doctrines of stare decisis and precedent are the foundations of our American common law system. This lesson explains what these doctrines are and how they are used.

What Is the Model Penal Code?

4. What Is the Model Penal Code?

The Model Penal Code (MPC) was established to offer a standard and universal text to help define criminal activity and determine what the punishment for that activity should be.

Mala in se: Definition, Crimes & Examples

5. Mala in se: Definition, Crimes & Examples

In this lesson, we'll go over the definition of 'mala in se' crimes. We will also distinguish between these types of crimes and ''mala prohibita'' crimes. Finally, examples will be provided to better illustrate the concept of ''mala in se'' crimes.

Mala Prohibita: Definition, Crimes & Examples

6. Mala Prohibita: Definition, Crimes & Examples

Learn what constitutes a mala prohibita crime. Review mala prohibita crimes and examine several examples. Upon conclusion of the lesson, you will have a thorough understanding of mala prohibita crimes.

What is the Difference Between a Misdemeanor & a Felony?

7. What is the Difference Between a Misdemeanor & a Felony?

What does calling someone a ~'felon~' mean? Are there only certain offenses that earn the title? This lesson will explore the differences between misdemeanor and felony level offenses, including degrees of severity and sentencing limits.

Types & Goals of Contemporary Criminal Sentencing

8. Types & Goals of Contemporary Criminal Sentencing

Criminal law is designed to punish wrongdoers, but punishment takes different forms and has varying goals. This lesson explores the types and goals of contemporary criminal sentencing.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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