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Ch 5: Keystone Biology Exam: Internal Homeostasis & Transportation

About This Chapter

Discover more details about internal homeostasis and transportation by looking through this educational chapter. It will help you properly prepare for the Keystone Biology exam.

Keystone Biology Exam: Internal Homeostasis & Transportation - Chapter Summary

Gain the right skills to adequately explain internal homeostasis and transportation on the Keystone Biology exam by looking through each lesson in this chapter. They will prepare you to answer questions about the following topics:

  • Structure and function of cells
  • Exocytosis and endocytosis
  • The fluid mosaic model
  • Phospholipid bilayer
  • The definition and examples of homeostasis
  • Temperature regulation in humans

The lessons are formatted to stimulate your mind about biology concepts, giving you the right information to help you do well on the exam. You can test your understanding along the way by taking lesson quizzes.

Keystone Biology Exam: Internal Homeostasis & Transportation Objectives

Taking the Keystone Biology exam gives you the opportunity to see what you know about biology topics. The goal of this exam is to see if you gained the right knowledge and skills in order to graduate high school. The topics discussed throughout this biology chapter are part of the module 1 section of the test. There are two types of questions on this exam: multiple-choice and open-ended. Both question types require you to look at diagrams and passages, and then give your best answer according to the biology principles you picked up from our chapter.

9 Lessons in Chapter 5: Keystone Biology Exam: Internal Homeostasis & Transportation
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Cell: Structure & Function

1. The Cell: Structure & Function

The cell is a small, but complex structure. Take a look inside the outer plasma membrane of a cell and discover the functions of some common cellular components, including the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and mitochondria, in this lesson.

How a Phospholipid Bilayer Is Both Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic

2. How a Phospholipid Bilayer Is Both Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic

In this lesson, we will learn what gives phospholipids a dual personality. How can this molecule be both hydrophobic and hydrophilic, and why is this important to a cell?

The Fluid Mosaic Model of the Cell Membrane

3. The Fluid Mosaic Model of the Cell Membrane

In this lesson, we will discuss the components of the cell membrane and why the fluid mosaic model paints the best picture of its structure. We'll learn about the roles of the phospholipid bilayer, cholesterol, proteins and carbohydrates.

Passive Transport in Cells: Simple and Facilitated Diffusion & Osmosis

4. Passive Transport in Cells: Simple and Facilitated Diffusion & Osmosis

A cell membrane is selectively permeable - not permeable to everything. In this lesson, we'll talk about methods of passive transport along a concentration gradient, including simple and facilitated diffusion and osmosis.

Active Transport in Cells: Definition & Examples

5. Active Transport in Cells: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we'll learn how substances are transported across the cell membrane against the concentration gradient. This might seem like an uphill battle for the cell, but all it takes is a little chemical energy and a few integral membrane proteins to kick off some active transport!

Endocytosis and Exocytosis Across the Cell Membrane

6. Endocytosis and Exocytosis Across the Cell Membrane

In this lesson, we'll discover how some cells can eat, drink, and digest their dinner through the process of endocytosis and a structure called the lysosome. In addition, we'll learn how a cell can throw out the leftovers across the cell membrane during exocytosis.

Membrane-Bound Organelles in Eukaryotic Cells

7. Membrane-Bound Organelles in Eukaryotic Cells

Eukaryotic cells have several types of organelles working inside them. In this lesson, we will examine the various types of membrane-bound organelles and their functions.

What Is Homeostasis? - Definition & Examples

8. What Is Homeostasis? - Definition & Examples

Homeostasis can be defined as a property of an organism or system that helps it maintain its parameters within a normal range of values. It is key to life, and failures in homeostasis can lead to diseases like hypertension and diabetes.

Homeostasis and Temperature Regulation in Humans

9. Homeostasis and Temperature Regulation in Humans

Do you wonder how your body is able to maintain a consistent temperature? Have you ever questioned why you get goosebumps when you're cold? This lesson will introduce you to homeostasis and answer your questions about body temperature regulation and reactions, like goosebumps.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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