Ch 19: Leadership Theories & Styles in Organizational Behavior

About This Chapter

This overview of leadership theories and styles in organizational behavior can expand your knowledge of Fiedler's contingency theory, the path-goal theory, and more. The short video lessons in this chapter are a valuable resource when preparing for a test or working on class assignments.

Leadership Theories & Styles in Organizational Behavior - Chapter Summary

The entertaining video lessons in this chapter get you up to speed on leadership theories and styles in organizational behavior. For instance, you can gain a better understanding of bureaucratic and transactional leadership styles, among others. By the end of the chapter, you should feel confident and ready to:

  • Provide an overview of Fiedler's contingency theory
  • Explain Hersey-Blanchard's model of situational leadership
  • Recall the path-goal theory as it relates to leadership styles
  • Give examples of leadership philosophies
  • Distinguish between task-oriented and people-oriented leadership

We've made learning fun with engaging lessons that can help you easily understand the topics presented on leadership theories and styles in organizational behavior. Depending on your needs, you can study all the lessons, or just focus on a handful of lessons to grasp specific concepts. You also have a chance to test your knowledge with a brief self-assessment quiz that's available for each lesson.

7 Lessons in Chapter 19: Leadership Theories & Styles in Organizational Behavior
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Fiedler's Contingency Theory & a Leader's Situational Control

1. Fiedler's Contingency Theory & a Leader's Situational Control

Fiedler's contingency theory states that there are three elements that dictate a leader's situational control. The three elements are task structure, leader/member relations, and positioning power.

Hersey-Blanchard's Model of Situational Leadership

2. Hersey-Blanchard's Model of Situational Leadership

Hersey-Blanchard's Model of Situational Leadership assumes that follower maturity is a major indicator of an employee's readiness to perform work. There are four leadership styles associated with the model: delegating, participating, selling and telling.

The Path-Goal Theory and Leadership Styles

3. The Path-Goal Theory and Leadership Styles

Path-Goal is a type of leadership theory that focuses on establishing a clear path to goal achievement. Leadership styles that are associated with this theory include: achievement-oriented, directive, participative and supportive leadership.

Leadership Philosophies: Types & Examples

4. Leadership Philosophies: Types & Examples

In this lesson, you will learn about three basic leadership styles, some specific leadership approaches, and the leadership philosophy that is the best for a given situation.

Leadership Orientation: Task-Oriented & People-Oriented

5. Leadership Orientation: Task-Oriented & People-Oriented

As a leader, are you focused on getting the job done or on making people happy? This lesson will explain the difference between task-oriented leaders and people-oriented leaders to better help you decide.

The Transactional Leader

6. The Transactional Leader

This lesson describes the characteristics of a transactional leader. Discover how a transactional leader depends on the concepts of actions and reactions to motivate, manage and guide employees to success.

The Bureaucratic Leader

7. The Bureaucratic Leader

You may hear people complain about the bureaucratic system and how it processes things slowly, but do you know why? This lesson describes characteristics of the bureaucratic leader. Learn how bureaucratic leadership can be used to improve businesses.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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