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Ch 5: Legal Procedures: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Legal Procedures chapter of this College-Level Introductory Business Law Help and Review course is the simplest way to master an understanding of legal procedures. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of legal procedures.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering college business material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn college business topics. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding lawsuits or working with threshold requirements
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning business content (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about legal procedures
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra business learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Legal Procedures chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Legal Procedures chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any legal procedures question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a legal procedures unit of a standard college business course. Topics covered include:

  • Pretrial pleadings and service of process in civil litigation
  • Defendant's response and motions in civil litigation
  • Jury trial and selection in civil litigation
  • Alternate forms of dispute resolution
  • Constitutional requirements of a criminal trial

22 Lessons in Chapter 5: Legal Procedures: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Starting a Lawsuit: Parties & Beginning Process

1. Starting a Lawsuit: Parties & Beginning Process

There are two parties to a lawsuit: the plaintiff, who initiates the lawsuit, and the defendant, who defends against the allegations waged against him. A lawsuit is a process that involves several steps beginning with the filing of a complaint and ending with a judge's or jury's decision.

Threshold Requirements: Standing, Case or Controversy & Ripeness

2. Threshold Requirements: Standing, Case or Controversy & Ripeness

Threshold requirements are conditions that a plaintiff must meet in order to take another person or entity to court. There are threshold requirements for standing, case and controversy and ripeness. With all three, the court will require answers to specific questions to determine whether legal action can be taken against a party.

Pretrial Pleadings & Service of Process in Civil Litigation

3. Pretrial Pleadings & Service of Process in Civil Litigation

Before a trial begins, there are several pleadings a plaintiff and defendant must file with the court to set a lawsuit into motion and this is known as the pretrial stage of a trial. Some common pleadings include a complaint, summons, motion to dismiss and motion for judgment.

Defendant's Response & Motions in Civil Litigation

4. Defendant's Response & Motions in Civil Litigation

Once a plaintiff initiates a civil lawsuit, the defendant must respond within a certain period of time depending on the particular state's requirements. The defendant responds by answering the complaint or filing a motion with the court.

Jury Trial and Selection in Civil Litigation

5. Jury Trial and Selection in Civil Litigation

When a civil action leads to a trial, a jury is selected. The selection process general involves the parties or attorneys for the parties to question potential jurors from a pool of jury candidates. Once a jury is selected, the jury trial moves through various steps ending in a final decision.

Delivering a Verdict in Civil Litigation

6. Delivering a Verdict in Civil Litigation

In any court case, the end result is a verdict. However, there are several roads that lead to the verdict, including motion to dismiss, directed verdict, special verdict and judgment notwithstanding the verdict.

Civil Appeals Process: Parties, Briefs & Oral Arguments

7. Civil Appeals Process: Parties, Briefs & Oral Arguments

The civil appeals process allows for a losing party to a lawsuit to request a higher court to review the decision to determine whether legal errors were made during the original trial.

Alternative Forms of Dispute Resolution: Negotiation, Mediation & Arbitration

8. Alternative Forms of Dispute Resolution: Negotiation, Mediation & Arbitration

In the eyes of the law, there are several ways a dispute can be settled. Some disputes can simply be negotiated to a win-win outcome. Others may require a third party to assist in coming up with solutions to remedy a situation.

Constitutional Requirements of a Criminal Trial

9. Constitutional Requirements of a Criminal Trial

In criminal court, a defendant will rely heavily on his constitutional rights to a fair trial. These rights, specifically the Fifth and Sixth Amendment Rights provide the requirements for a criminal trial. Some rights include right to a speedy trial, right to counsel and a right to an impartial jury. There are several other equally important rights that this important amendment protects.

Writ of Habeas Corpus & Reasonable Doubt in a Criminal Trial

10. Writ of Habeas Corpus & Reasonable Doubt in a Criminal Trial

In a last ditch effort to be free, a person in custody, after exhausting all appeals and motions, may file a writ of habeas corpus requesting further investigation of his constitutional rights in an attempt to be set free.

Civil Forfeiture: Definition, Laws & Abuse

11. Civil Forfeiture: Definition, Laws & Abuse

Civil forfeiture refers to the laws and regulations that permit the government to seize assets without filing criminal charges. In this lesson, you will learn about the history of civil forfeiture, how civil forfeiture works, and recent examples of governmental abuse.

Legal Representation: Definition & Rights

12. Legal Representation: Definition & Rights

Legal representation is the process of lawyers representing their clients in court and the work that the lawyers do during the proceedings. This lesson discusses legal representation and the rights of clients.

Trademark vs. Copyright

13. Trademark vs. Copyright

Have you ever wondered as to the difference between a trademark and a copyright? This lesson explains what each one protects and how long each type of protection generally lasts.

Conglomerate Merger: Definition & Examples

14. Conglomerate Merger: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we'll discuss conglomerate mergers, the combination of two companies. We'll define pure and a mixed mergers, give advantages and disadvantages of each, and supply real-world examples of mergers.

What is a Dishonorable Discharge? - Consequences & Reasons

15. What is a Dishonorable Discharge? - Consequences & Reasons

What happens when someone commits a crime while they are in the military? This lesson defines a dishonorable discharges and discusses the consequences that follow.

Types of Military Discharges

16. Types of Military Discharges

This lesson encompasses the types of military discharges, example scenarios, and which discharges are eligible for veteran benefits. This lesson provides a real case example to further understanding on the topic.

Affiant: Definition, Role & Example

17. Affiant: Definition, Role & Example

Maybe on TV you've seen someone write and sign a statement under oath. If you have, that document you saw was an affidavit and the person signing it was an affiant. This lesson explains what each of these mean and their purpose in the criminal justice world.

Affidavit: Definition, Examples & Types

18. Affidavit: Definition, Examples & Types

Ever wonder what the paper is that people sign under oath, and is used as evidence? Well, here is your chance! This lesson will cover everything you need to know about an affidavit.

How to Write an Affidavit: Format, Template & Sample

19. How to Write an Affidavit: Format, Template & Sample

In this lesson, you'll learn what an affidavit is and how to write one. Once you have your facts gathered and organized, you can reference the included sample template to create your own affidavit.

What is an Affidavit of Truth? - Definition & Example

20. What is an Affidavit of Truth? - Definition & Example

Some individuals in the United States consider themselves sovereign citizens. They do not conform to the laws enforced by the U.S. government. How are they able to do this? Learn about the affidavit of truth and how it is part of the process of becoming a sovereign citizen.

Affidavit of Service: Definition, Purpose & Example

21. Affidavit of Service: Definition, Purpose & Example

When the law requires court documents to be served on an opposing party, proof of service is required. An affidavit of service is an accepted method of providing that proof. In this lesson we will learn what an affidavit of service is and under what conditions it's used.

Affidavit of Domicile: Definition, Terms & Example

22. Affidavit of Domicile: Definition, Terms & Example

In this lesson, we will examine the purpose of an affidavit of domicile and how it is used by the executor of a deceased person's estate to transfer inheritances.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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