Ch 12: Literary Terms for 11th Grade: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Literary Terms for 11th Grade chapter of this 11th Grade English Help and Review course is the simplest way to master literary terms. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of literary terms for 11th grade.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering 11th grade English material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn 11th grade English. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding similes in literature or working with types of irony
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning 11th grade English (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about literary terms for 11th grade
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra English learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Literary Terms for 11th Grade chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Literary Terms for 11th Grade chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any literary terms for 11th grade question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a Literary Terms for 11th Grade unit of a standard 11th grade English course. Topics covered include:

  • Metaphor and simile
  • Personification and apostrophe
  • Types of irony
  • Allusion and illusion
  • Foreshadowing
  • Allegory in literature
  • Symbolism and imagery in literature

22 Lessons in Chapter 12: Literary Terms for 11th Grade: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

1. What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

Metaphors are all around you. They're the bright sparkling lights that turn plain evergreens into Christmas trees. Learn how to spot them, why writers write with them, and how to use them yourself right here.

Synecdoche vs. Metonymy: Definitions & Examples

2. Synecdoche vs. Metonymy: Definitions & Examples

Would you lend your ears for a moment (or at least your eyeballs)? This lesson will explain what synecdoche and metonymy mean and how to spot them in a piece of prose or poetry.

Cliches, Paradoxes & Equivocations: Definitions & Examples

3. Cliches, Paradoxes & Equivocations: Definitions & Examples

Learn about cliches, paradoxes, and equivocations, and how they can weaken or strengthen certain types of writing. Explore examples of all three from literature and daily life.

Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

4. Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

Explore the simile and how, through comparison, it is used as a shorthand to say many things at once. Learn the difference between similes and metaphors, along with many examples of both.

Personification and Apostrophe: Differences & Examples

5. Personification and Apostrophe: Differences & Examples

In this lesson, explore how writers use personification to give human characteristics to objects, ideas, and animals. Learn about apostrophe, or when characters speak to objects, ideas, and even imaginary people as if they were also characters.

Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

6. Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

Discover, once and for all, what irony is and is not. Explore three types of irony: verbal, situational and dramatic, and learn about some famous and everyday examples.

Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

7. Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

Allusions and illusions have little in common besides the fact that they sound similar. Learn the difference between the two and how allusions are an important part of literature and writing - and how to spot them in text.

What Are Literary Motifs? - Definition & Examples

8. What Are Literary Motifs? - Definition & Examples

In this lesson, you will learn about how writers use themes in works of literature as a way to explore universal ideas like love and war. You will also explore motifs, or repeating objects and ideas, which can contribute to theme.

Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

9. Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

Just who is telling this story? In this lesson, we'll look at point of view, or the perspective from which a work is told. We'll review first person, second person and third person points of view.

Narrators in Literature: Types and Definitions

10. Narrators in Literature: Types and Definitions

Learn how point of view, or the angle from which a story is told, impacts the narrative voice of a work of literature. Explore, through examples, how point of view can be limited, objective, or omniscient.

What is Foreshadowing? - Types, Examples & Definitions

11. What is Foreshadowing? - Types, Examples & Definitions

Learn about how authors use foreshadowing, both subtle and direct, as part of their storytelling process. Explore many examples of foreshadowing, from classical plays to contemporary stories.

What is Catharsis? - Definition, Examples & History in Literature and Drama

12. What is Catharsis? - Definition, Examples & History in Literature and Drama

In this lesson, learn about catharsis, a purging of feelings that occurs when audiences have strong emotional reactions to a work of literature. Explore examples of literary works which lead to catharsis, including tragedies.

Allegory in Literature: History, Definition & Examples

13. Allegory in Literature: History, Definition & Examples

Learn about allegories and how stories can be used to deliver messages, lessons or even commentaries on big concepts and institutions. Explore how allegories range from straightforward to heavily-veiled and subtle.

Consonance, Assonance, and Repetition: Definitions & Examples

14. Consonance, Assonance, and Repetition: Definitions & Examples

In this lesson, explore the different ways authors repeat consonant and vowel sounds in their literary works. Learn about how writers use repeated words and phrases with well-known examples.

Understatement & Litotes: Differences, Definitions & Examples

15. Understatement & Litotes: Differences, Definitions & Examples

In this lesson, explore the use of understatement as a way to draw attention to a specific quality or to add humor. Learn about litotes, a specific form of understatement, and discover examples from literature.

Euphemism: Definition & Examples

16. Euphemism: Definition & Examples

This lesson defines euphemisms, alternate language used in place of offensive language or when discussing taboo topics. Explore some examples of euphemisms in everyday language and well-known examples from literature.

Symbolism & Imagery in Literature: Definitions & Examples

17. Symbolism & Imagery in Literature: Definitions & Examples

In this lesson you will learn how poets and authors use symbolism in their writing to make it more meaningful and interesting. Explore how descriptive writing called imagery appeals to the senses, adding to works of literature.

Compound Subject: Definition & Examples

18. Compound Subject: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we study the compound subject construction, a writing technique whereby multiple subjects are assigned responsibility for a common action.

Funeral Oration: Definition & Examples

19. Funeral Oration: Definition & Examples

The art of funeral oration first appeared in the Greek culture as far back as approximately 450 B.C. when Pericles spoke at a funeral for fallen soldiers. In this lesson, we will look at the past history of funeral oration and how it has continued to be used in modern times.

What is a Transitive Verb? - Definition & Examples

20. What is a Transitive Verb? - Definition & Examples

This lesson covers transitive verbs. Learn how to define and identify these kinds of verbs with the aid of examples, and discover the difference between transitive and intransitive verbs. Then take a quiz to test your understanding.

What is Parallel Structure? - Definition & Examples

21. What is Parallel Structure? - Definition & Examples

This lesson will explain what parallel structure is and present examples of it. It will also provide you with direction on how to use this literary technique and how to find and fix issues with parallel structure.

What is Pathos? - Definition & Meaning

22. What is Pathos? - Definition & Meaning

Find out what pathos is and how to use it in your persuasive writing. Learn about the three appeals of persuasive writing, and then take a quiz to test your knowledge.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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