Ch 12: Literature Comprehension & Practice: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10

About This Chapter

Use the lessons to help your students grasp the skills necessary to analyze texts and make connections between two or more works. Suggestions below may give you a place to use these lessons to help your students meet seven grade literature Common Core Standards..

Standard: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.10)

About This Chapter

Students who have a developed capacity for literary analysis should be able to read and interpret texts within their complexity band with ease. Your students should be able to draw conclusions about plot, setting, characters, and author intent in their analysis. In this chapter, lessons cover how to make connections between texts and provide for example summaries and analyses of titles including:

  • Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe
  • Washington Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle
  • Laurence Yep's Dragonwings
  • Robert Frost's 'The Road Not Taken'
  • Louise Fletcher's Sorry, Wrong Number
  • John Adams' 'Letter on Thomas Jefferson'
  • Russell Freedman's Freedom Walkers

Mastery of the analytical skills modeled and explained here will lead to students exhibiting a high capacity for synthesis of the concepts and meanings behind works of literature. They can demonstrate skills in applying their understanding of texts both to real life and to other works. These skills will help them become more interactive readers of all kinds of materials, both fiction and non-fiction.

How to Use These Lessons in Your Classroom

Use these activity suggestions during your regular curriculum to help you meet the standards for the Common Core.

Introduction

Show the video on comparing two texts in class. Discuss with students how they are going to approach their independent analysis of their text(s).

Modeling Instruction

Use these videos in the modeling phase to give students an idea of how their own analysis might look after they read and dissect their text. Ask questions to explore the text more deeply and determine what kinds of questions the students might have before actually reading the text. Each of our instructors has a slightly different approach, so students can get a feel for how the process is individualized and their unique perspective should shine through in their work.

Re-teaching

For students who are struggling in their analysis, have them review videos related to their work to get an idea of how they might break it down themselves. Have them complete the related lesson quizzes to test their understanding of the video.

10 Lessons in Chapter 12: Literature Comprehension & Practice: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.10
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Making Text-to-Text Connections Between Written Works

1. Making Text-to-Text Connections Between Written Works

In this lesson, we will discuss connecting different writings to each other by learning about the authors, examining the literary elements, and reflecting on the writings.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Themes and Analysis

2. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Themes and Analysis

In this lesson, we will continue our exploration of Mark Twain's most acclaimed work, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, through an analysis of plot, characters, and theme.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Plot Summary and Characters

3. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Plot Summary and Characters

In this lesson, we will learn about Mark Twain's most acclaimed work, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, through a close examination of characters and plot.

Robinson Crusoe: Summary and Themes

4. Robinson Crusoe: Summary and Themes

In this lesson, we'll explore Daniel Defoe's 'Robinson Crusoe' while examining themes present in the work. You may also learn some handy skills if you ever find yourself shipwrecked and having to survive on an island for 28 years.

Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow: Summary and Analysis

5. Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow: Summary and Analysis

Everyone loves a scary story now and then. Learn how Washington Irving's famous story, ''The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,'' uses imagination and the supernatural to make it a Romantic piece of American literature that is still adapted by television today.

Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle: Summary and Analysis

6. Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle: Summary and Analysis

The story of 'Rip Van Winkle' is one of enchantments and escape. In this lesson, we look at how Washington Irving uses his words and Romantic characteristics to create the story's theme.

Dragonwings by Laurence Yep: Summary & Analysis

7. Dragonwings by Laurence Yep: Summary & Analysis

This lesson provides a summary and analysis of how Laurence Yep's 1975 novel ''Dragonwings'', a work of historical fiction about a Chinese-American father and son living in San Francisco in the early 1900s, compares with real accounts of the same events.

Lucille Fletcher's Sorry, Wrong Number: Summary & Analysis

8. Lucille Fletcher's Sorry, Wrong Number: Summary & Analysis

Lucille Fletcher's ''Sorry, Wrong Number'' is a 1940s radio drama, a play meant to be heard rather than seen. In this lesson you'll learn the plot and some of the major ideas from this landmark audio production.

John Adams' Letter on Thomas Jefferson: Summary & Analysis

9. John Adams' Letter on Thomas Jefferson: Summary & Analysis

John Adams wrote a letter explaining why he asked Thomas Jefferson to write the Declaration of Independence. In this lesson, you'll learn about his ideas and how he made his case.

Russell Freedman's Freedom Walkers: Summary & Analysis

10. Russell Freedman's Freedom Walkers: Summary & Analysis

In this lesson, we will explore Russell Freedman's 'Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott,' and examine how the story's events led to the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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