Ch 9: Literature Lessons for Grade 8: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.10

About This Chapter

Use the following video lessons to reinforce independent reading comprehension. These lessons are just a part of our Grade 8 Common Core Literature course.

Standard: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

About This Chapter

Students who have mastered this standard are able to read independently a variety of literature types. When responding to their readings, in writing or discussions, students will be able to demonstrate a high degree of comprehension.

Lessons in this standard address concepts such as:

  • Tips for summarizing, interpreting and analyzing prose and poetry
  • Understanding themes, motifs and characters
  • Using inferences, context clues and visualizing in bolstering comprehension
  • Understanding historical settings in which authors accomplished their works, to better comprehend their writings

Students establish proficiency in this standard when discussing or writing about works of literature appropriate for their grade level. They are able to cite textual evidence to support their analyses. Students' grasp of this standard supports their readiness for college and career because being able to understand grade level literature and respond in a thoughtful fashion makes them effective communicators.

How to Use These Lessons in Your Classroom

Here are some ideas for using these lessons to support instruction in the CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.10 standard:

Themes and Analysis Lessons

View the lesson pertaining to the themes and analysis of Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn with your students. Ask them to read the book over the coming days. Upon students' completion of reading, lead a classroom discussion checking for understanding of the book's themes. Assign essay topics to determine proficiency, in which students will cite textual evidence. Topics might include dialect, social constraints, morals of the time, the Mississippi River as a character and the book's place within the Realism or Regionalism movements.

Tone and Mood Lessons

Share the video lesson about Edith Wharton with your students. Share select portions of Ms. Wharton's autobiography, A Backward Glance: An Autobiography, with the class. Assign readings of Ethan Frome and House of Mirth. Discuss possible themes and plot points in these two books that Edith Wharton may have borrowed from her own life. Assign written essays comparing and contrasting the tone and mood in these two novels, asking students to cite textual evidence to support their analyses.

Symbolism and Literary Effects Lessons

View the lesson concerned with Edgar Allan Poe's poem The Raven with your students. Discuss poetic devices, looking at examples in this poem and additional works by Poe. Ask students to write short essays explaining the symbolism and literary devices used in The Raven to create the darkly romantic effects of this well-known poem.

Literature Choices for Lessons

In addition to the authors and literature listed above, we offer lessons pertaining to other authors and writing pieces appropriate for the end of 8th grade, including:

  • Langston Hughes
  • Walt Whitman
  • Emily Dickinson
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  • Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels and A Modest Proposal
  • John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men
  • Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe

14 Lessons in Chapter 9: Literature Lessons for Grade 8: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.10
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Themes and Analysis

1. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Themes and Analysis

In this lesson, we will continue our exploration of Mark Twain's most acclaimed work, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, through an analysis of plot, characters, and theme.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Plot Summary and Characters

2. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Plot Summary and Characters

In this lesson, we will learn about Mark Twain's most acclaimed work, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, through a close examination of characters and plot.

Langston Hughes & the Harlem Renaissance: Poems of the Jazz Age

3. Langston Hughes & the Harlem Renaissance: Poems of the Jazz Age

Langston Hughes was a popular poet from the Harlem Renaissance. His Jazz Age poems, including 'Harlem' and 'I, Too, Sing America,' discussed the racism facing African Americans in the 1920s and '30s.

Walt Whitman: Transcendental and Realist Poet

4. Walt Whitman: Transcendental and Realist Poet

Walt Whitman is now considered one of the greatest American poets of all time, but his work was not so well-loved when it first debuted. Find out what made the man and his poems so controversial.

Walt Whitman's Poetry and Transcendentalism

5. Walt Whitman's Poetry and Transcendentalism

In this lesson, we're going to study the poetry of Walt Whitman. We're also going to take a close look at Transcendentalism, a spiritual and literary movement of 19th-century America.

Emily Dickinson: Poems and Poetry Analysis

6. Emily Dickinson: Poems and Poetry Analysis

Emily Dickinson was a well-known poet of the mid-1800s whose numerous works have stood the test of time. But what in the world did her poems really mean? In this video, we'll explore one of her most recognized pieces and analyze its meaning and purpose.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: Poem Analysis

7. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: Poem Analysis

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was known as a fireside poet because his poems were read by the fire as a means of entertainment. Learn about how he created American history through the use of musical elements, like rhythm and rhyme scheme.

Jonathan Swift and Satire: Examples and Analysis

8. Jonathan Swift and Satire: Examples and Analysis

When it comes to English-language satire, few authors can top the legendary Jonathan Swift. Watch this lesson to learn about his two most important works, ~'A Modest Proposal~' and ~'Gulliver's Travels~'.

Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift: Satire, Parody, and Folly

9. Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift: Satire, Parody, and Folly

In this lesson, we're going to explore Jonathan Swift's book Gulliver's Travels. We'll review the plot and then see how Swift incorporates satire and parody to show the depths of human folly.

A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift: Satire and Social Commentary

10. A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift: Satire and Social Commentary

In this lesson, we're going to learn about satire by examining Jonathan Swift's essay A Modest Proposal. We'll see how Swift uses satire to make important social commentary.

Robinson Crusoe: Summary and Themes

11. Robinson Crusoe: Summary and Themes

In this lesson, we'll explore Daniel Defoe's 'Robinson Crusoe' while examining themes present in the work. You may also learn some handy skills if you ever find yourself shipwrecked and having to survive on an island for 28 years.

Of Mice and Men: Summary and Analysis of Steinbeck's Style

12. Of Mice and Men: Summary and Analysis of Steinbeck's Style

John Steinbeck's 'Of Mice and Men' is one of the most enduring American stories of friendship. Watch this video lesson to learn about its characters, main plot events and key themes.

Edgar Allan Poe's The Raven: Summary and Analysis

13. Edgar Allan Poe's The Raven: Summary and Analysis

This video introduces Edgar Allan Poe's 'The Raven.' Through Poe's use of poetic devices and dark Romantic characteristics, he is able to achieve the 'unity of effect' to appeal to critics and the masses both during his time and even still today.

What is a Ballad? - Definition & Examples

14. What is a Ballad? - Definition & Examples

Let's learn about the poetical form of the ballad and examine two of the most famous English ballads. We will learn about the common traits of ballads and how they relate to modern music.

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