Ch 4: LSAT: Logical Reasoning

About This Chapter

This chapter presents lessons that were designed to help prepare you for your upcoming LSAT test. Lessons will give you a better understanding of the topic of logical reasoning.

LSAT: Logical Reasoning - Chapter Summary

Let our subject-matter experts help you as you get ready to take the LSAT. In this chapter, you will review samples of logical reasoning questions, logical fallacy, and reasoning by analogy. Additionally, these lessons are intended to assist you in answering LSAT questions on lesson topics like:

  • Strategies for approaching LSAT logical reasoning questions
  • The process of logical thinking
  • Steps and tips for formal logic problem solving
  • Common patterns of deductive and inductive reasoning
  • Parts of an argument and constructing an argument from the premise to conclusion
  • Analyzing an argument's effectiveness and validity and drawing conclusions
  • How to identify misunderstandings and points of contention
  • Methods for detecting assumption in arguments

Our lesson instructors created these short lessons to get you up to speed on logical reasoning. Each lesson features a self-assessment quiz that can be used at lesson end to verify your understanding of the material covered. We include a handy feature that allows you to submit a question to a Study.com expert if you need any extra assistance. Track your progress on this chapter on your dashboard.

12 Lessons in Chapter 4: LSAT: Logical Reasoning
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Logical Reasoning Questions on the LSAT

1. Logical Reasoning Questions on the LSAT

Not to be confused with the Analytical Reasoning section (as it's sometimes referred to as the Logic Games section), Logical Reasoning is all about parsing arguments and demonstrating the skills of critical evaluation that are necessary for success in the field of law. Read on for more details and tips about this lengthy portion of the exam.

Logical Thinking: Definition & Process

2. Logical Thinking: Definition & Process

Logical thinking is a process of clearly moving from one related thought to another. In this lesson, you will examine the definition and process of logical thinking, and then you'll get to test your knowledge with a quiz.

Logical Fallacy: Definition & Examples

3. Logical Fallacy: Definition & Examples

This lesson will introduce you to the logical fallacy and explain how it works in an argument. We'll also discuss examples of common fallacies and the importance of identifying and avoiding them in effective arguments. Then test your knowledge with a quiz.

Common Patterns of Deductive Reasoning

4. Common Patterns of Deductive Reasoning

In this lesson, you'll explore how some conclusions can be drawn with certainty. Learn about this type of logic through examples and a quiz, to check if you can match arguments to the patterns they use.

Common Patterns of Inductive Reasoning

5. Common Patterns of Inductive Reasoning

In this lesson, you'll find out what type of arguments we use just to get through everyday life. We will explore the variety of ways inductive arguments determine what is most likely, and probable.

Reasoning By Analogy: Definition & Examples

6. Reasoning By Analogy: Definition & Examples

Reasoning by analogy is a great way to help persuade, explain, and understand new ideas or concepts. The use of analogies in law is done through appeal to precedent, where old cases are applied to new ones in order to apply the law consistently.

Argument Structure: From Premise to Conclusion

7. Argument Structure: From Premise to Conclusion

In this lesson, consider examples of an argument, as the term is understood in philosophy. You'll learn how to create appropriate premises and how this influences how likely it is for a listener to accept your conclusion.

Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

8. Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

To effectively write an argument, you need to know the four basic parts. In this lesson, you will learn the definitions of the four basic parts and why you need them in an argument.

How to Analyze an Argument's Effectiveness & Validity

9. How to Analyze an Argument's Effectiveness & Validity

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze an argument. We will pay close attention to the parts of an argument and the questions we must ask about each of those parts in order to determine the argument's effectiveness and validity.

Drawing Conclusions From an Argument

10. Drawing Conclusions From an Argument

In this lesson, learn about the different ways you can draw conclusions. Learn how each one applies in the criminal justice environment and then experience scenarios that include the different ways to draw a conclusion.

Recognizing Misunderstandings & Points of Disagreement

11. Recognizing Misunderstandings & Points of Disagreement

In this lesson, you will learn why misunderstandings occur and how to identify them. This lesson will also cover the different areas where people are most likely to have disagreements.

Detecting Assumptions in Arguments

12. Detecting Assumptions in Arguments

This lesson covers how to determine if an argument has been made based off of assumptions. It will also cover what needs to be done in order to make an argument valid. Multiple examples of assumptive argruments are provided, along with their re-structured arguments.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 160 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support