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Ch 4: Major Events During American Imperialism: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Major Events During American Imperialism chapter of this Post-Civil War U.S. History Help and Review course is the simplest way to master an understanding of the major events related to American imperialism. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of major events during American imperialism.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering post-Civil War U.S. history material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn post-Civil War U.S. history. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding the major events during the United States' rise to power
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning history (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about the major events during American imperialism
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra history learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Major Events During American Imperialism chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Major Events During American Imperialism chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any question about major events during American imperialism. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a major events during American imperialism unit of a standard post-Civil War U.S. history course. Topics covered include:

  • The Spanish-American War
  • American imperialism in Hawaii, China and the Philippines
  • American imperialism in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Causes of World War I
  • American involvement in World War I

24 Lessons in Chapter 4: Major Events During American Imperialism: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
American Imperialism: Definition, Reasons & Rising International Power

1. American Imperialism: Definition, Reasons & Rising International Power

When George Washington left office, he warned against getting drawn into global issues, yet just over 100 years later, the U.S. began its rise to become the dominant world power. What started this rise of American Imperialism?

The Spanish-American War: Causes, Goals & Results

2. The Spanish-American War: Causes, Goals & Results

The Spanish-American war was a new kind of war involvement for the U.S. It was not for freedom, it was not an internal conflict. It was fought over expansion and the idea of spreading American influence in the Caribbean and in the Philippines.

American Imperialism in Hawaii, China & the Philippines

3. American Imperialism in Hawaii, China & the Philippines

American imperialism had a major effect on the world. In this lesson, find out how a nation became a part of the U.S. for almost 50 years and how one kingdom became a U.S. state. The effect of U.S. imperialism in Asia and the Pacific had a long-lasting and far-reaching effect that we can still see today!

American Imperialism in Latin America & the Caribbean

4. American Imperialism in Latin America & the Caribbean

Around the turn of the 20th century, the United States entered a period of non-colonial imperial expansion throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. Learn about the short-term and long-term effects of some of these policies in this video lesson.

Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

5. Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

Although World War I began in Europe, it is important to take a look at World War I in relation to U.S. history as well. The U.S. was greatly affected by the war. In this lesson, we'll take a quick and direct look at the causes that led up the war and the assassination that was the final catalyst.

The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

6. The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

The United States' best option was to stay out of World War I. They had nothing to gain from getting involved. So, they tried to stay neutral, but as American interests started to lean toward the Allied Powers, many events happened to give the States the final push to enter the war.

American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

7. American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

As much as the U.S. wanted to stay neutral during World War I, it proved impossible. This meant the U.S. had to raise the forces and money to wage war. Find out how Americans played their part in WWI in this lesson.

End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

8. End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

In this lesson, we will examine the Treaty of Versailles. We will explore the treaty's negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference, take a look at the treaty's terms, and discuss Germany's reaction to the treaty.

History of the Pan-Americanism Movement

9. History of the Pan-Americanism Movement

From the Monroe Doctrine and conquests of Simon Bolivar to the modern Organization of American States, many have felt a level of unity between the different countries of the Americas to be a worthwhile goal.

Building the New Navy

10. Building the New Navy

Largely due to the efforts of Theodore Roosevelt, the United States Navy went from barely being able to defend a fishing fleet to one of the most powerful navies in the world. This lesson explains how it was done.

Major Battles of the Spanish-American War

11. Major Battles of the Spanish-American War

Despite the fact that it had major effects on American foreign policy, even continuing today, the Spanish-American War was decided by only a small number of battles. This lesson explains three of the most important.

The Annexation Debate & Rebellion of the Philippines

12. The Annexation Debate & Rebellion of the Philippines

In this lesson, we'll look at how the Philippines changed following the 1898 Spanish-American War. While the Filipinos may have hoped for independence, the Americans had different ideas. Following the lesson, you can test your knowledge with a quiz.

Puerto Rico: U.S. Acquisition & Rule

13. Puerto Rico: U.S. Acquisition & Rule

Ask someone to describe Puerto Rico's relationship with the US and you'll get either a confused look or a long, legal answer. This lesson explains the history of that complex relationship, as well as why Puerto Ricans tend to be happy with the way things are now.

Woodrow Wilson: Presidency & Reforms

14. Woodrow Wilson: Presidency & Reforms

Woodrow Wilson went from being a political scientist to one of America's most loved presidents. This lesson looks at his development as a politician, his reforms, and the achievements of his presidency.

Life in the United States During World War I

15. Life in the United States During World War I

While the exploits of the American Expeditionary Force under General Pershing may receive more attention, the real effects of World War I for the United States were felt much closer to home.

Inflation & Strikes After World War I

16. Inflation & Strikes After World War I

After returning from the war overseas, many Americans found higher prices and lower paying jobs. As a result, a number of strikes took place in 1919 that caused America to ask tough questions about the relationship of management and labor.

Racial Tension During & After World War I

17. Racial Tension During & After World War I

While the Civil War may have introduced the United States to a new type of racial tension, it was World War I in which these tensions became fully exposed. This lesson tells how a country that fought for freedom ended up giving birth, again, to the KKK.

Carrie Chapman Catt: Biography, Quotes & Accomplishments

18. Carrie Chapman Catt: Biography, Quotes & Accomplishments

Carrie Chapman Catt was one of the most vital organizers, speakers, and writers of the women's rights movement. In this lesson, we will explore the life of Carrie Chapman Catt, her notable accomplishments, and read some of her famous quotes.

Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914: Definition & Summary

19. Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914: Definition & Summary

Through this lesson, you will learn about antitrust laws and why they are important in U.S. law and economics. You will also see why the Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914 is so important to us in the present day.

George Creel: Biography & Work During WWI

20. George Creel: Biography & Work During WWI

George Creel was an American writer, politician, and an investigative journalist. His life's path took him from a tough childhood to the head of one of the most important domestic war departments during World War I: The Committee for Public Information.

Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points: Definition, Speech & Summary

21. Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points: Definition, Speech & Summary

Learn about President Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points speech delivered in 1918. Discover what these points actually were and how they affected the outcome of the end of World War I. Following this, test your new knowledge with a quiz.

Woodrow Wilson's New Freedom: Definition, Plan & Platform

22. Woodrow Wilson's New Freedom: Definition, Plan & Platform

The presidential election of 1912 was a crucial moment in American politics. Offering up his vision of what needed to be done, Woodrow Wilson offered his New Freedom. In it, he spelled out both the core problems America faced and the reforms he hoped to implement, including reining in the big corporations dominating the country's economy.

What are the Regions of the United States?

23. What are the Regions of the United States?

What are the regions of the United States? This lesson discusses the different regional areas and their significance to American culture. A short quiz will follow to test your knowledge.

What are the Four Regions of Texas?

24. What are the Four Regions of Texas?

The geography of Texas is hugely varied, from beaches to mountains. You can break Texas down into four main regions, divided by rivers, escarpments and other natural features.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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