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Ch 20: Manifest Destiny & the American Civil War

About This Chapter

Easily review Manifest Destiny and the American Civil War ahead of an important exam with this professionally designed chapter as your guide. We've included lessons and quizzes you can access 24 hours a day using any computer or mobile device with an internet connection.

Manifest Destiny & the American Civil War - Chapter Summary

In this chapter, our instructors provide you with handy lessons on the American Civil War and Manifest Destiny. Some of the subjects covered include westward migration to the Pacific Ocean via the Oregon Trail and the Texas annexation problem. This chapter has been created to assist you in achieving these objectives:

  • Outline the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the Wilmot Proviso and the Mexican-American War
  • Discuss President Fillmore and the Compromise of 1850
  • Explain the election of President Lincoln, southern secession and the new Confederacy
  • Detail the start of the Civil War and the Battle of Fort Sumter
  • Understand the context and legacy of the Emancipation Proclamation
  • Identify turning points in the Civil War, including the battles of Vicksburg, Gettysburg and Chancellorsville
  • Outline General Grant's march toward Richmond and the end of the Civil War
  • Detail Lee's surrender at Appomattox Courthouse and the assassination of Lincoln

These concise video lessons make these topics easy to understand and highly accessible for convenient study. Each lesson is accompanied by a short quiz to help you maximize your study experience. The comprehensive chapter test is a helpful way to ensure you're ready for test day or to move on to other subjects.

10 Lessons in Chapter 20: Manifest Destiny & the American Civil War
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Oregon Trail: Westward Migration to the Pacific Ocean

1. The Oregon Trail: Westward Migration to the Pacific Ocean

Throughout the first half of the 19th century, the United States expanded its borders all the way to the Pacific Ocean, fulfilling its manifest destiny. Find out about the reasons people wanted this land, the path that took them there and the politicians who supported it all.

Manifest Destiny's Texas Annexation Problem

2. Manifest Destiny's Texas Annexation Problem

Find out why it took five presidents (Jackson, Van Buren, Harrison, Tyler and Polk) to get Texas annexed into the U.S. and added as a state during the era of Manifest Destiny.

The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo & the Wilmot Proviso

3. The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo & the Wilmot Proviso

The controversial Mexican-American War lasted from 1846-1848. In this lesson, discover how the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo expanded the southern part of the United States all the way to the Pacific Ocean.

President Fillmore and the Compromise of 1850

4. President Fillmore and the Compromise of 1850

Following President Zachary Taylor's death, Millard Fillmore took office. He supported the Compromise of 1850 that added new states from the Mexican cession and attempted to resolve long-standing controversies over slavery.

Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

5. Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

Learn about how Abraham Lincoln's election in the contentious 1860 presidential race set off a domino effect leading to the secession of South Carolina and six other states and the formation of the Confederate States of America.

The Battle of Fort Sumter & the Start of the Civil War

6. The Battle of Fort Sumter & the Start of the Civil War

South Carolina's attack on a U.S. military outpost triggered the American Civil War. Learn more about the Battle of Fort Sumter and the consequences of the fort's surrender to the Confederacy.

The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

7. The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect. More than three million slaves in the South were freed, but the move was not without its critics, both then and now.

Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

8. Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

In 1863, three events proved to be turning points for the American Civil War: the Battle of Chancellorsville, the Battle of Gettysburg and the Siege of Vicksburg. Learn about these Civil War turning points in this lesson.

End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

9. End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

President Lincoln took a gamble and named Ulysses S. Grant as General-in-Chief of the Union army. They devised a plan to finally take Richmond and win the war in 1864. In this lesson, learn about General Grant's controversial tactics.

Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

10. Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

Two of the most eventful weeks in American history took place between April 1 and April 15, 1865, during which Richmond (the capital of the Confederacy) fell, General Lee surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse and President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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