Ch 9: Measurement in Research: Homework Help

About This Chapter

The Measurement in Research chapter of this Research Methods in Psychology Homework Help course helps students complete their measurement in research homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How it works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your measurement in research homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample questions and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your measurement in research homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • Measurement's importance in the research process
  • Qualitative vs. quantitative measurement
  • Conceptualization and operationalization
  • Continuous, discrete and categorical variables
  • Scales of measurement
  • Types of tests
  • Various types of measurement
  • Common research measurement scales
  • Measurement reliability and ways it can be improved
  • The validity of measurement
  • The reliability and validity relationship

14 Lessons in Chapter 9: Measurement in Research: Homework Help
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Importance of Measurement in the Research Process

1. The Importance of Measurement in the Research Process

Why is it important to measure variables in a study? And, how do you go about doing it? In this lesson, we'll examine the importance of measurement, along with some common types of psychological measurement.

The Difference Between Qualitative & Quantitative Measurement

2. The Difference Between Qualitative & Quantitative Measurement

In research, there are generally two types of data. In this lesson, we'll look at quantitative and qualitative measurement, when each are used, and how researchers can sometimes use both.

Conceptualization & Operationalization in Measurement

3. Conceptualization & Operationalization in Measurement

When designing a study, how do you make sure that everyone knows what you're talking about? How do you measure things that seem difficult to measure? In this lesson, we'll look at two key steps in research: conceptualization and operationalization.

Continuous, Discrete & Categorical Variables: Definition and Examples

4. Continuous, Discrete & Categorical Variables: Definition and Examples

When doing research, variables come in many types. In this lesson, we'll explore the three most common types of variables: continuous, discrete, and categorical.

Scales of Measurement: Nominal, Ordinal, Interval & Ratio

5. Scales of Measurement: Nominal, Ordinal, Interval & Ratio

When doing research, variables are described on four major scales. In this lesson, we'll look at the major scales of measurement, including nominal, ordinal, interval, and ratio scales.

Types of Tests: Norm-Referenced vs. Criterion-Referenced

6. Types of Tests: Norm-Referenced vs. Criterion-Referenced

What's the best way to score tests? In this lesson, we'll look at two major types of tests that are scored differently from each other: norm-referenced and criterion-referenced tests.

Types of Measurement: Direct, Indirect & Constructs

7. Types of Measurement: Direct, Indirect & Constructs

How do you measure psychological traits? In this lesson, we'll look at how psychologists measure traits, including direct and indirect observation. We will also explore why psychological traits are so difficult to measure.

Commonly Used Research Measurement Scales

8. Commonly Used Research Measurement Scales

How do you measure a person's thoughts or feelings when you can't see them? In this lesson, we'll look at common measurement scales that psychologists use when examining thoughts and feelings.

The Reliability of Measurement: Definition, Importance & Types

9. The Reliability of Measurement: Definition, Importance & Types

Psychologists use tools like surveys and tests to measure psychological traits. But, what happens when a measurement tool is not consistent? In this lesson, we'll examine what reliability is, why it is important, and some major types.

Methods for Improving Measurement Reliability

10. Methods for Improving Measurement Reliability

Reliability is the consistency of the results of a measurement tool. But, what causes a tool to have low reliability? And, what can be done to improve reliability? In this lesson, we'll answer both of those questions.

The Validity of Measurement: Definition, Importance & Types

11. The Validity of Measurement: Definition, Importance & Types

How do you know if you are measuring what you actually want to measure? In this lesson, we'll look at what validity is, why it is important, and four major types of validity: face, construct, content, and predictive validity.

The Relationship Between Reliability & Validity

12. The Relationship Between Reliability & Validity

Though reliability and validity are different from each other, they are still related. In this lesson, we'll look at the differences of and relationship between reliability and validity.

Clinical Significance vs. Statistical Significance

13. Clinical Significance vs. Statistical Significance

What does it mean if the results of a study are significant? In this lesson, we'll about the difference between statistical significance and clinical significance, and what this means for applying the results of research to the real world.

Clinical Significance: Definition & Example

14. Clinical Significance: Definition & Example

There are a myriad of treatments available, but how effective are they really? If a treatment is clinically significant, it has been determined that it is capable of bringing a client back to a relative normal functioning, or at least a marked improvement. Learn the definition and examples in this lesson.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support