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Ch 10: Measuring Amounts of Reactants

About This Chapter

These self-paced lessons on measuring amounts of reactants can assist you with a homework assignment, class project, or test preparation. You can review Avogadro's number, molar volume, chemical formulas, and more from a platform that works on your computer or mobile device.

Measuring Amounts of Reactants - Chapter Summary

This chapter is a quick and easy way to get up to speed on measuring amounts of reactants. Our expert instructors discuss different types of chemical formulas and Gay-Lussac's law. You can also use the self-paced lessons to review how scientists measure and count atoms, despite the fact that they are so tiny. After completing the chapter, you should be able to:

  • Explain Avogadro's number
  • Discuss mass changes with metals and oxygen
  • Provide examples of chemical formulas
  • Describe how Avogadro's law is used to calculate the volume of gas
  • Recall the relationship between gas pressure and temperature

These text and video lessons are taught in a way that makes the material easy to understand and remember. A full written transcript accompanies each video lesson just in case you are partial to text-based learning. If you find yourself struggling with a topic, you can use the Help feature to submit questions to instructors. Additionally, a brief quiz is available for each lesson to make sure you comprehend what you have reviewed.

5 Lessons in Chapter 10: Measuring Amounts of Reactants
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Avogadro's Number: Using the Mole to Count Atoms

1. Avogadro's Number: Using the Mole to Count Atoms

How do we move from the atomic world to the regular world? Because atoms are so tiny, how can we count and measure them? And what do chemists celebrate at 6:02 AM on October 23rd each year? In this lesson, you will be learning how Avogadro's number and the mole can answer these questions.

Mass Changes with Metals & Oxygen

2. Mass Changes with Metals & Oxygen

Certain metals react with oxygen to form metallic oxides. In this lesson, we will discuss how certain metals react with the oxygen in the air to form new compounds resulting in a change in mass.

What is a Chemical Formula? - Definition, Types & Examples

3. What is a Chemical Formula? - Definition, Types & Examples

Chemical formulas provide a lot of information about chemical substances, such as how many and what atoms they are made of, as well as the way the atoms are arranged. In this lesson, we'll discuss the different types of chemical formulas.

Molar Volume: Using Avogadro's Law to Calculate the Quantity or Volume of a Gas

4. Molar Volume: Using Avogadro's Law to Calculate the Quantity or Volume of a Gas

Have you ever wondered why a balloon expands when you blow it up? How something as light as air is able to exert a force large enough to inflate a balloon? In this lesson, you will learn about the relationship between the volume of a container filled with a gas and the number of gas particles that container holds. This relationship is known as Avogadro's Law.

Gay-Lussac's Law: Gas Pressure and Temperature Relationship

5. Gay-Lussac's Law: Gas Pressure and Temperature Relationship

You may know that you aren't supposed to put an aerosol can in a fire because it could explode, but do you know why? In this lesson, we will explain Gay-Lussac's law, which shows the relationship between the temperature and pressure of a gas.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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