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Ch 7: MEGA Chemistry: Gas Laws

About This Chapter

Take a closer look at gas laws by exploring the video lessons in this chapter. You can gain greater insight into kinetic molecular theory, Boyle's and Charles' laws and more as you study for the MEGA Chemistry assessment.

MEGA Chemistry: Gas Laws - Chapter Summary

This comprehensive overview can ensure you're prepared to address questions on gas laws on the MEGA Chemistry assessment. After reviewing the short video lessons, you will have the knowledge to:

  • Define kinetic molecular theory and describe the properties of gas
  • Explain Boyle's law and the relationship between gas pressure and volume
  • Discuss Charles' law and the temperature and gas volume correlation
  • Share details about Gay-Lussac's law and the relationship between temperature and gas pressure
  • Describe the ideal gas law
  • Understand the gas constant
  • Provide details about how to use the ideal gas law and calculate volume, pressure and more

Instructors present the video lessons in a high-quality visual format that makes studying for the exam entertaining. If you'd prefer to access the lessons in their written format, transcripts are available with vocabulary words that help deepen your comprehension of gas laws. You can take brief quizzes and a chapter exam to reinforce concepts learned in the lessons. Any questions about topics in this chapter can be submitted to our experts.

6 Lessons in Chapter 7: MEGA Chemistry: Gas Laws
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Kinetic Molecular Theory: Properties of Gases

1. The Kinetic Molecular Theory: Properties of Gases

What makes a gas ideal? What types of characteristics do ideal gases have? In this lesson, we will discuss the many characteristics of gases and how knowing the microscopic properties of gas particles will help you understand the macroscopic properties of a gas.

Boyle's Law: Gas Pressure and Volume Relationship

2. Boyle's Law: Gas Pressure and Volume Relationship

Have you ever wondered how an air powered water gun works? It uses the fantastic properties of gases to make a summer day more enjoyable! In this lesson, we will be discussing Boyle's Law and the relationship between pressure and volume of a gas.

Charles' Law: Gas Volume and Temperature Relationship

3. Charles' Law: Gas Volume and Temperature Relationship

In this lesson, we will discover why the wind blows and what causes a hot air balloon to rise, a couple of the applications of Charles' Law that explain the relationship between the volume and temperature of a gas.

Gay-Lussac's Law: Gas Pressure and Temperature Relationship

4. Gay-Lussac's Law: Gas Pressure and Temperature Relationship

You may know that you aren't supposed to put an aerosol can in a fire because it could explode, but do you know why? In this lesson, we will explain Gay-Lussac's law, which shows the relationship between the temperature and pressure of a gas.

The Ideal Gas Law and the Gas Constant

5. The Ideal Gas Law and the Gas Constant

Have you ever wondered why the pressure in your car's tires is higher after you have been driving a while? In this lesson, we are going to discuss the law that governs ideal gases and is used to predict the behavior of real gases: the ideal gas law.

Using the Ideal Gas Law: Calculate Pressure, Volume, Temperature, or Quantity of a Gas

6. Using the Ideal Gas Law: Calculate Pressure, Volume, Temperature, or Quantity of a Gas

In another lesson, you learned that the ideal gas law is expressed as PV = nRT. In this video lesson, we'll go one step further, examining how to rearrange the equation to solve for a missing variable when the others are known.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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