Ch 23: MEGA Marketing: Consumer Protection Laws

About This Chapter

Refamiliarize yourself with the laws related to business and marketing by viewing these lessons on consumer protection laws. Use the information presented here as the foundation for your overall study plan in preparation for the MEGA Marketing exam.

MEGA Marketing: Consumer Protection Laws - Chapter Summary

In these lessons, you will review the laws that have been put into place to protect consumers against questionable, unethical or unfair business practices. The following topics are covered in the videos:

  • Product liability and consumer protection laws
  • Types of antitrust laws and defective product liability
  • Restrictions of the Sherman Act
  • Legalities and politics surrounding marketing
  • Government regulations and major regulatory agencies
  • Definition and terminology of contract law
  • Employment law, discrimination and Worker's Compensation
  • Unionizing and collective bargaining

Comprehensive and informative, these lessons are designed to save you time. They typically last no more than ten minutes, and the timeline feature allows you to skip to the segments you specifically want to view. This, added to the mobile nature of this study guide, enables you to study efficiently from any location that offers Internet access.

MEGA Marketing: Consumer Protection Laws Chapter Objectives

The MEGA Marketing exam assesses the knowledge and skills of those seeking a marketing teacher certification in Missouri. The test is computer based and includes 100 questions, all of which are multiple choice. The lessons in the Consumer Protection Laws chapter of our MEGA Marketing test prep study guide fall within the guidelines in Domain II: Marketing Functions, which accounts for 36% of the test.

15 Lessons in Chapter 23: MEGA Marketing: Consumer Protection Laws
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What Is Consumer Protection? - Product Liability, Laws & Rights

1. What Is Consumer Protection? - Product Liability, Laws & Rights

The laws that establish consumer rights in business practices fall under the umbrella of consumer protection. Learn how the Federal Trace Commission enforces consumer protection laws, and discover the principles of product liability by exploring a famous case example, Escola vs Coca-Cola.

What Is Product Liability? - Definition & Laws

2. What Is Product Liability? - Definition & Laws

Product liability refers to the legal responsibility of a business if it produces and/or sells a faulty good or service. Explore the definition and three different theories of product liability: breach of warranty, negligence, and strict liability.

Antitrust Law: Definition, Types & Outline

3. Antitrust Law: Definition, Types & Outline

Antitrust law refers to the federal and state laws and regulations that govern business activities to promote open markets that are competitive and free of monopolies. Explore the definition and types of antitrust law and an outline of how these laws have developed.

Defective Products Liability

4. Defective Products Liability

When companies produce defective products, they can be held liable. Learn about defective products liability, the three types of defects, design flaws, and manufacturing defects. Review cases to understand what can happen when a company fails to warn consumers about product defects.

The Political and Legal Environment of Marketing

5. The Political and Legal Environment of Marketing

The marketing industry operates in a political and legal environment. Learn about the federal legislation, regulatory agencies, and state laws that affect business operations, including marketing. Explore the functions of the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the Federal Trade Commission, and the Food and Drug Administration.

Horizontal and Vertical Agreements that Violate the Sherman Act

6. Horizontal and Vertical Agreements that Violate the Sherman Act

The Sherman Anti-Trust Act of 1890 was enacted to prevent unfair competition through horizontal and vertical agreements. Learn about types of violations, including price fixing, market allocations, boycotts, tying agreements, and monopolies, as well as about the rule of reason used by the courts.

Types of Regulation, Privatization, & Deregulation

7. Types of Regulation, Privatization, & Deregulation

The government monitors business through regulation, or managing through laws. Explore the types of regulation and learn about the role of privatization, deregulation, cross subsidization, and cost-of-service in reforming regulations.

Major U.S. Federal Regulatory Agencies in Business: Types, Functions & Authority

8. Major U.S. Federal Regulatory Agencies in Business: Types, Functions & Authority

Federal regulatory agencies oversee the operations of companies to ensure ethical, safe, and professional business practices. Learn about the types, functions, and authority of major U.S. federal regulatory agencies in business.

The Cost and Benefits of Regulation in Business

9. The Cost and Benefits of Regulation in Business

Examine the costs and benefits that regulation has on business. Review the concept of regulation before exploring the various costs that regulation has on business while also understanding the benefits businesses realize by regulation.

Contract Law Terms: Definitions & Contract Types

10. Contract Law Terms: Definitions & Contract Types

Contract law terms include six elements in order to make contracts legal. Explore the six elements and the definitions and types of contracts including express, implied in-fact, implied in-law, and illusory promise.

What is Employment Law? - An Introduction to Employment Law

11. What is Employment Law? - An Introduction to Employment Law

Employment law is the state and federal laws that protect worker rights, prevent discrimination, and promote safe work environments. Learn how to recognize state and federal employment laws by completing the introduction to employment law.

Employment Discrimination: Definition and Laws

12. Employment Discrimination: Definition and Laws

Employment discrimination is defined as the act of discriminated against a potential employee based on their race, color, sex, religion, national origin, physical disability, sexual orientation, transgender status, or age. Learn more about employment discrimination and the important laws that protect against such discrimination, including title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. .

What Is Workers' Compensation? - Laws and Purpose

13. What Is Workers' Compensation? - Laws and Purpose

Workers' compensation is a form of insurance employers must have to protects their employees who become injured or ill on the job. Explore the purpose of workers' compensation, the laws associated with workers' compensation, and federal workers' compensation in this lesson.

Closed vs. Open Shops in Labor Relations & Impacts on Human Resource Management

14. Closed vs. Open Shops in Labor Relations & Impacts on Human Resource Management

In closed shops, all employees must be members of a union, and in open shops, union membership is optional. Learn about closed vs. open shops, their roles in labor relations and effects on hiring, and examine collective bargaining agreements.

Employer Restrictions and Rights in Unionizing Process & Collective Bargaining

15. Employer Restrictions and Rights in Unionizing Process & Collective Bargaining

When an organization's employees are union members, employers have rights and options, as well as limitations, as they negotiate and work with union leaders. Learn about employer restrictions and rights in the unionizing process and collective bargaining. Explore the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), and understand employers' obligations as per NLRA.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 220 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Support