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Ch 41: Michigan Merit Exam - Math: Probability

About This Chapter

The quick video lessons and quizzes in this chapter will help remind you of the areas of probability you need to know for the Michigan Merit Exam. You will be provided with methods to help you understand the ways of approaching similar questions on exam day.

Michigan Merit Exam - Math: Probability - Chapter Summary

You can view brief video lessons that will remind you of dependent and independent probabilities. The mixture of video lessons and quizzes can help you remember and reinforce your understanding of the following items before the Michigan Merit Exam:

  • Unions, intersections, and elements
  • Subsets
  • Probability of independent, single, dependent, complementary, and compound events
  • 'At least one' rule
  • Simple conditional probabilities
  • Connection between independence and conditional probabilities

If you need to go directly to specific parts of the video lessons, you can use the timeline feature. You can also review the video transcripts. Our experts and instructors can assist you if you have any questions.

7 Lessons in Chapter 41: Michigan Merit Exam - Math: Probability
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Mathematical Sets: Elements, Intersections & Unions

1. Mathematical Sets: Elements, Intersections & Unions

Today we're going to explore mathematical sets, which are surprisingly simple! Sets are just collections of any objects or concepts, also known as elements, that can be related to each other through union or intersection.

Events as Subsets of a Sample Space: Definition & Example

2. Events as Subsets of a Sample Space: Definition & Example

Probability can get very confusing at times. You will find that some words, such as events and subsets, are often referring to the same concept depending on the experiment. Use this lesson to understand the concept of events as subsets.

Probability of Simple, Compound and Complementary Events

3. Probability of Simple, Compound and Complementary Events

Simple, compound, and complementary events are different types of probabilities. Each of these probabilities are calculated in a slightly different fashion. In this lesson, we will look at some real world examples of these different forms of probability.

Probability of Independent and Dependent Events

4. Probability of Independent and Dependent Events

Sometimes probabilities need to be calculated when more than one event occurs. These types of compound events are called independent and dependent events. Through this lesson, we will look at some real-world examples of how to calculate these probabilities.

Probability of Independent Events: The 'At Least One' Rule

5. Probability of Independent Events: The 'At Least One' Rule

Occasionally when calculating independent events, it is only important that the event happens once. This is referred to as the 'At Least One' Rule. To calculate this type of problem, we will use the process of complementary events to find the probability of our event occurring at least once.

How to Calculate Simple Conditional Probabilities

6. How to Calculate Simple Conditional Probabilities

Conditional probability, just like it sounds, is a probability that happens on the condition of a previous event occurring. To calculate conditional probabilities, we must first consider the effects of the previous event on the current event.

The Relationship Between Conditional Probabilities & Independence

7. The Relationship Between Conditional Probabilities & Independence

Conditional and independent probabilities are a basic part of learning statistics. It's important that you can understand the similarities and differences between the two as discussed in this lesson.

Chapter Practice Exam
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Practice Final Exam
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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the Michigan Merit Exam - Math: Test Prep & Practice course

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