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Ch 5: Modern World History - Patterns of Interaction Chapter 4: The Atlantic World (1492-1800)

About This Chapter

The Atlantic World chapter of this McDougal Littell Modern World History - Patterns of Interaction Textbook Companion course helps students learn the essential world history lessons of European exploration and colonization in 1492-1800. Each of these simple and fun video lessons is about five minutes long and is sequenced to align with the Atlantic World textbook chapter.

How it works:

  • Identify the lessons in McDougal Littell Modern World History - Patterns of Interaction's The Atlantic World chapter with which you need help.
  • Find the corresponding video lessons within this companion course chapter.
  • Watch fun videos that cover the European exploration and colonization topics you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

Students will learn:

  • Reasons why the Europeans ventured to the Americas
  • Goals of major Portuguese explorers
  • Major Spanish explorers and Spanish colonies
  • New Netherlands, New Sweden, and New France settlements
  • Problems affecting the Jamestown settlement
  • Puritans' role in establishing the New England colonies
  • Impact of European colonization on the indigenous population
  • Triangular Trade system and slavery
  • Slave trade in colonial America
  • Impact of the Columbian Exchange
  • Limitations of the capitalist system
  • Economic effects of the Commercial Revolution

McDougal Littell Modern World History - Patterns of Interaction is a registered trademark of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, which is not affiliated with Study.com.

11 Lessons in Chapter 5: Modern World History - Patterns of Interaction Chapter 4: The Atlantic World (1492-1800)
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Old World and New World: Why Europeans Sailed to the Americas

1. The Old World and New World: Why Europeans Sailed to the Americas

This lesson will focus on the Age of Exploration. It will explain the main reasons why Europeans explored the New World. It will highlight their spirit of adventure, the religious desire to see natives converted, and the chance to acquire wealth.

Great Explorers of Spain and Portugal: Aims & Discoveries

2. Great Explorers of Spain and Portugal: Aims & Discoveries

This lesson will focus on the New World explorations of Spain and Portugal. It will list explorers from both of these countries while also highlighting the motivations behind European exploration.

New Spain: Spanish Explorers and Spanish Colonies

3. New Spain: Spanish Explorers and Spanish Colonies

Who are the most well-known explorers and conquistadors of the New World? In this lesson, we'll look at some of the most infamous explorers. We'll discover the difference between explorers and conquistadors, and then learn about the encomienda system.

New France, New Netherlands & New Sweden: North American Settlements

4. New France, New Netherlands & New Sweden: North American Settlements

Spain and England weren't the only European nations trying to establish colonies in the New World. The French had a foothold for more than a century, and the Dutch and Swedish fought for their own places in America.

The Settlement of Jamestown Colony

5. The Settlement of Jamestown Colony

In 1607, the London Company settled the colony of Jamestown. The settlers overcame many odds to become the first permanent, English settlement in North America. In this lesson, learn about the failures and successes of Jamestown before it was taken over by the Crown.

The Puritans and the Founding of the New England Colonies

6. The Puritans and the Founding of the New England Colonies

Learn about the people and motives that led to the founding of Massachusetts Bay Colony, as well as the growth and internal dissent that led to the establishment of Rhode Island, Connecticut and New Hampshire.

Effects of European Colonization: Christopher Columbus and Native Americans

7. Effects of European Colonization: Christopher Columbus and Native Americans

The earliest explorers in the Western Hemisphere left a legacy that would shape the development of the Americas permanently. No matter what they came looking for, Europeans left behind death, horses, and metal.

Rise of Slave Trade: Black History in Colonial America

8. Rise of Slave Trade: Black History in Colonial America

In this lesson, you'll learn a little about the slave trade, the growth and characteristics of slavery in the colonial period - including laws regulating the institution and the population of free blacks in the English colonies.

The Columbian Exchange

9. The Columbian Exchange

The Columbian Exchange is a term used to denote the world-changing exchange of agricultural goods, slave labor, diseases, and ideas between the Eastern and Western Hemispheres that occurred after the year 1492 CE.

Capitalism and the Free Market: Definition & Limitations

10. Capitalism and the Free Market: Definition & Limitations

Capitalism is an economic system that has played a dominant part in building the world in which we currently live. In this lesson, you'll learn about some key concepts of capitalism, as well as its limitations.

The Commercial Revolution: Economic Impact of Exploration and Colonization on Europe

11. The Commercial Revolution: Economic Impact of Exploration and Colonization on Europe

In this lesson, we'll discuss the Commercial Revolution sparked by Europe's interaction with the New World colonies. We'll learn about how mercantilism, banking and joint-stock companies transformed the economic face of the European continent.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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