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Ch 3: Motion in One Dimension

About This Chapter

In this chapter, you will have the opportunity to reaffirm what you already know or learn new facts about speed, motion and acceleration. Use this information to prepare for specific types of exams, such as those used for student assessment or college entrance purposes.

Motion in One Dimension - Chapter Summary

The lessons in this chapter are designed to help you develop a deeper understanding of calculations and equations used to solve motion, speed, acceleration and velocity problems. You'll understand how to use a distance-time graph, apply the laws of motion and how forces elicit movement on objects. Once you have completed your study of this chapter, you should be able to:

  • Describe the laws of motion and identify terms associated with these laws
  • Calculate motion in a plane
  • Differentiate between speed and velocity
  • Discuss aspects of acceleration
  • Use examples to explain how forces act on objects to cause movement
  • Explain the use of force-time and distance-time graphs

Instructors with extensive backgrounds in science provide simple explanations and examples to explain this material. Track your progress through this chapter using your Dashboard and access video and text lessons at any time, on any device. Self-assessment quizzes allow you to determine your understanding of these topics and your readiness in moving on from one lesson to the next.

6 Lessons in Chapter 3: Motion in One Dimension
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Motion? - Definition & Laws

1. What is Motion? - Definition & Laws

Motion is the act of moving and plays a huge role in the study of physics. This lesson walks through important terms and the laws of motion that guide the study of motion.

Motion in a Plane: Principles & Calculations

2. Motion in a Plane: Principles & Calculations

Motion in a plane includes linear motion, rotational motion, and projectile motion. This lesson will focus on two-dimensional, linear motion of a single object, and linear motion of two objects moving relative to each other. In both scenarios unit-vectors will be utilized to organize the displacements, velocities, and accelerations of the object(s); and techniques will taught that help to solve these types of kinematics problems.

Speed and Velocity: Difference and Examples

3. Speed and Velocity: Difference and Examples

Is it possible to drive with a speed of 100 mph but a velocity of 0? In this lesson, we will examine the difference between speed and velocity and use that information to answer this question.

Acceleration: Definition, Equation and Examples

4. Acceleration: Definition, Equation and Examples

Acceleration can be a tricky topic for many students who tend to get hung up on an object's speed. In this lesson, we will explore the common aspects of acceleration and why speed is not always important.

Implications of Mechanics on Objects

5. Implications of Mechanics on Objects

Forces act on objects causing them to move. Mechanics is the field of science designated to the study of moving objects. This lesson describes how forces act on objects resulting in motion. Examples are used to describe how forces interact resulting in both simple and complex movement.

Force vs. Time & Force vs. Distance Graphs

6. Force vs. Time & Force vs. Distance Graphs

In this lesson, you'll find out how to determine impulse from a force-time graph and speed from a distance-time graph. You'll also learn how to describe the general shape of these graphs for simple harmonic motion.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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