Ch 8: MTEL Speech: Legalities & Free Speech

About This Chapter

Get information about legalities and free speech through this chapter. Afterwards, you can address specific questions on the MTEL Speech examination for teacher certification. The chapter includes educational video lessons along with short quizzes.

MTEL Speech: Legalities & Free Speech - Chapter Summary

Study legalities and free speech during your quest to prepare for the MTEL Speech examination's questions. The chapter contains video lessons that discuss freedom of speech as well as freedom of press and assembly. The importance of legal and ethical communication in the corporate world is explored through lessons that describe disclaimers, disclosures and financial reporting. Look at the importance of the Sedition Act of 1918 and examine the historical significance of John Milton's essay, Areopagitica, which is about freedom of the press. When you finish this chapter, you should be able to discuss the following:

  • The freedom of speech, press and assembly
  • The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen
  • Major court cases pertaining to freedom of speech
  • Faulty assumptions that deal with public speaking

Take as much time as you need to study, since the chapter is self-paced. You can memorize the material as you watch the videos on your mobile device. Click the arrow when you want to start or pause the educator-developed video lessons. When you complete each of the lessons, take its corresponding quiz to make certain you thoroughly grasp the information that's been presented.

MTEL Speech: Legalities & Free Speech Chapter Objectives

The MTEL Speech test aims at determining whether you have the kind of subject knowledge that qualifies you to teach speech classes in Massachusetts. You should expect to answer 100 multiple-choice questions and two open-response assignments during the MTEL Speech examination. In addition to the 15 minutes you'll spend on a tutorial and nondisclosure agreement, you'll have four hours to complete this computer-based assessment.

The first of the exam's three subareas contains questions on the topics you will have studied throughout this chapter. Worth 40% of the approximate test weighting, the subarea on the role of public speech in democratic societies will test your knowledge of freedom of expression, unethical communication laws, the responsibilities of the modern media and U.S. Supreme Court rulings on cases pertaining to freedom of speech.

11 Lessons in Chapter 8: MTEL Speech: Legalities & Free Speech
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Freedom of Speech? - Definition, Amendment & Rights

1. What is Freedom of Speech? - Definition, Amendment & Rights

In this lesson, we explore freedom of speech. An inalienable right preserved for U.S. citizens by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, freedom of speech is modified, given, or denied by most countries.

Milton's Areopagitica: Summary & Analysis

2. Milton's Areopagitica: Summary & Analysis

John Milton's Areopagitica is one of the earliest essays arguing for the freedom of the press and against preemptive censorship. Learn more about the content and history of this important piece of historical writing.

The Constitutional Monarchy: Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen & the Civil Constitution

3. The Constitutional Monarchy: Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen & the Civil Constitution

In this lesson, we will study the moderate phase of the French Revolution, focusing specifically on the Tennis Court Oath, the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen, the Civil Constitution of the Clergy, and the constitutional monarchy.

On Liberty by John Stuart Mill: Summary & Analysis

4. On Liberty by John Stuart Mill: Summary & Analysis

John Stuart Mill's 1859 book 'On Liberty' is considered one of the most important works of political philosophy ever written. In it, Mill expounds on his theories of utilitarianism and individual freedom. In this lesson, we will summarize and analyze the book.

Freedom of Speech, Press & Assembly: Definition, Importance & Limitations

5. Freedom of Speech, Press & Assembly: Definition, Importance & Limitations

In this lesson, we will learn about the freedom of speech, press and assembly. We will take a closer look at the rationale behind these freedoms and the specific clauses of freedom of speech, press and assembly and what they mean to society today.

Schenck v. United States: Summary

6. Schenck v. United States: Summary

''Schenck v. United States'' is a Supreme Court case from 1919. In this lesson, we will learn about the First Amendment freedom of expression and the concept of clear and present danger developed by this case.

Abrams v. United States & the 1918 Sedition Act

7. Abrams v. United States & the 1918 Sedition Act

In this lesson we'll explore the Sedition Act of 1918 and the subsequent Supreme Court case, Abrams v. United States. We'll learn about the context behind the Sedition Act, and highlight the key themes surrounding the Abrams v. United States court case.

New York Times v. Sullivan: Summary & Overview

8. New York Times v. Sullivan: Summary & Overview

During the Civil Rights era, issues around the First Amendment rights to free speech and free press were carefully watched. In this lesson, we'll learn about New York Times v. Sullivan which was a landmark decision regarding freedom of the press.

Chaplinsky v. New Hampshire: Summary & Overview

9. Chaplinsky v. New Hampshire: Summary & Overview

Chaplinksy v. New Hampshire is a famous U.S. Supreme Court case that established the fighting words doctrine. Fighting words and certain other forms of speech are not protected by the First Amendment. This lesson examines the Chaplinsky decision.

Legal and Ethical Communication: Description & Importance

10. Legal and Ethical Communication: Description & Importance

Legal and ethical communication is essential to companies to ensure truthful, accurate and morally-correct decision making. Companies need to give consideration to how they communicate and remain lawful in their day-to-day business activities.

Communication Theory, Faulty Assumptions, and Decision Making in Public Speaking

11. Communication Theory, Faulty Assumptions, and Decision Making in Public Speaking

Many times the psychology of people influence how they speak and what they hear. This lesson discusses some of the faulty assumptions made through psychological phenomenon in public speaking.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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