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Ch 3: MTEL Speech: Principles of Argument & Debate

About This Chapter

Study this chapter to refresh your understanding of the basic principles of argumentation and debate. A thorough understanding of these principles will aid you in your preparation for the MTEL Speech exam.

MTEL Speech: Principles of Argument & Debate - Chapter Summary

These lessons address the main principles of argumentation and debate to help you get ready for the MTEL Speech exam. In addition to explaining how to write a persuasive argument, this chapter will detail the following:

  • Justified claims vs. subjective opinions
  • Refuting an argument
  • The structure of an argument
  • Various formats for debates
  • Inductive vs. deductive reasoning
  • Common kinds of fallacies
  • Differences between causal and analogical reasoning
  • Cross examination techniques

These lessons are presented to you as brief videos, but are accompanied by full transcripts that highlight key terminology to help you in your studies. After each lesson you may test your knowledge by taking the short practice quizzes.

MTEL Speech: Principles of Argument & Debate Chapter Objectives

Before you obtain your license to teach speech courses in Massachusetts, you must pass the MTEL Speech exam. This test features 100 multiple-choice questions and 2 open-response items meant to assess your knowledge of various aspects of speech. Forty percent of the exam focuses on public speaking, including the principles of argumentation and debate.

By reviewing the content of this chapter, you will have the opportunity to develop your knowledge of the basics of argumentation and debate, thereby preparing you for any pertinent questions on the exam. Also, as the practice quizzes are in the same multiple-choice format as the exam itself, they will provide excellent practice for answering the exam questions.

10 Lessons in Chapter 3: MTEL Speech: Principles of Argument & Debate
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Philosophical Fallacies & Argumentation

1. Philosophical Fallacies & Argumentation

In this lesson, learn how fallacies are sometimes used when arguing one's case and why they are problematic. Consider examples of fallacies in everyday life and relate them to fallacies in philosophy.

The Role of Argument in Critical Thinking

2. The Role of Argument in Critical Thinking

In this lesson, you'll consider what makes a good argument that involves critical thinking. You'll also learn the shortcomings of using opinions to try to prove a claim is valid.

How to Write a Great Argument

3. How to Write a Great Argument

Many times our writing must not just be informative but it must also be persuasive. One of the best ways to be very persuasive is to use a great argument. Learn six steps you can follow to write a great argument.

Refutation of an Argument: Definition & Examples

4. Refutation of an Argument: Definition & Examples

In academic writing, the ability to refute an argument is a cornerstone of logical and critical thought, as well as an essential persuasive tool. Learn more through a comprehensive definition and examples, then put your new expertise to the test with a quiz.

Argument Structure: From Premise to Conclusion

5. Argument Structure: From Premise to Conclusion

In this lesson, consider examples of an argument, as the term is understood in philosophy. You'll learn how to create appropriate premises and how this influences how likely it is for a listener to accept your conclusion.

Understanding Different Debate Formats

6. Understanding Different Debate Formats

The rules and structures for debate forums can be confusing. This lesson will explain the rules, structures, and challenges associated with two major debate formats to 'keep you in the know.' Read on for details.

The Differences Between Inductive and Deductive Reasoning

7. The Differences Between Inductive and Deductive Reasoning

Inductive and deductive reasoning are often confused. This lesson introduces the concept of reasoning and gives you tips and tricks to keeping inductive and deductive reasoning straight.

Understanding Fallacy: Common Fallacies

8. Understanding Fallacy: Common Fallacies

There are hundreds of logical fallacies. Some are mathematical and complex, and some are deep and philosophical. In this lesson, you will learn about some of the most common types of fallacies you will come across in public speaking.

Causal and Analogical Reasoning: Impact on Public Speaking

9. Causal and Analogical Reasoning: Impact on Public Speaking

Causal and analogical reasoning are often confused and sometimes difficult to understand. In this lesson, you will learn the differences between the two types of reasoning and the way each of them is used in public speaking.

Cross Examination: Definition, Techniques & Examples

10. Cross Examination: Definition, Techniques & Examples

Lawyers have the ability to ask witnesses questions in the courtroom, which is cross examination. This lesson will define cross examination, discuss cross examining techniques and provide examples.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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