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Ch 17: MTLE Communication Arts/Literature: The Writing Process

About This Chapter

Review the steps in the writing process in this chapter of the MTLE Communication Arts/Literature study guide. Video lessons and self-assessment quizzes help you prepare for the MTLE Communication Arts/Literature exam.

MTLE Communication Arts/Literature: The Writing Process - Chapter Summary

The lessons in this chapter explore the writing process, including how to organize an essay, developing the essay topic, and structure paragraphs in an essay. Tone, how to engage readers, and transitions are also covered in this review chapter designed to help you prepare for the MTLE Communication Arts/Literature exam. Additionally, by the end of this chapter, you should be familiar with:

  • Steps in the writing process
  • Using information from multiple sources
  • Parallelism
  • Writing logical sentences
  • Sentence agreement
  • Proofreading
  • Writing revisions

Short, engaging video lessons thoroughly explain each step in the writing process, and the jump feature allows you to skip directly to main subjects within the video. Video lessons are accompanied by transcripts with important terms bolded. Self-assessment quizzes are also available to ensure your full understanding and retention of the material.

14 Lessons in Chapter 17: MTLE Communication Arts/Literature: The Writing Process
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Writing Process: Definition & Steps

1. The Writing Process: Definition & Steps

Writing is one of the most common ways we communicate. To be a successful writer, you should practice the five steps of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publication.

How to Organize an Essay

2. How to Organize an Essay

In this video, we will cover the steps involved in organizing an essay. We'll talk about titles, introductory paragraphs, concluding paragraphs, main points, transition statements and editing.

Developing the Essay Topic

3. Developing the Essay Topic

The backbone of any essay is a strong and engaging main idea. Learn how to turn an essay prompt into a well-developed topic by watching this video lesson.

How to Structure Paragraphs in an Essay

4. How to Structure Paragraphs in an Essay

When structuring a paragraph, you shouldn't just go throwing together a few sentences. The sentences that make up a paragraph should all flow together and represent the same topic to make up a strong paragraph. This video explains how to put together your sentences and paragraphs to maximize their impact.

Tone, Audience & Purpose in Essays

5. Tone, Audience & Purpose in Essays

What is tone? How do you create a tone within an essay? Watch this video lesson to learn how writing with a specific audience and purpose in mind will help you to achieve an appropriate tone.

How to Engage Readers by Picking and Developing an Appeal

6. How to Engage Readers by Picking and Developing an Appeal

There are three types of appeals that you can use in your persuasive writing to make your arguments more effective. In this video, you'll learn about logical, ethical, and emotional appeals as well as how to use them.

How Transitions Show Shifts, Sequence & Relationships in Your Writing

7. How Transitions Show Shifts, Sequence & Relationships in Your Writing

When you write just about any kind of paper, whether it's story writing or essay writing, use transitions to help your reader make connections and move easily through your paper. Here are some specific ways to use transitions.

How to Use Information from Multiple Sources in an Essay

8. How to Use Information from Multiple Sources in an Essay

Writing an academic paper requires researching and including sources. But how do you use your sources? How should they be included in your paper? This lesson will discuss using multiple sources correctly.

Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

9. Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

Sentences that aren't parallel sound funny, even if they look perfectly correct at first glance. Learn what makes a sentence parallel, how to revise a sentence to make it parallel, and how to write beautiful, balanced sentences of your own.

How to Write and Use Transition Sentences

10. How to Write and Use Transition Sentences

Like a road map, transitions guide readers through your essay. This lesson examines the way writers transition between sentences, within paragraphs and between paragraphs to make for a smooth reading experience.

How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

11. How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

Your sentences may not always make as much sense as you think they do, especially if you're comparing two or more things. It's easy to let comparisons become illogical, incomplete, or ambiguous. Learn how to avoid making faulty comparisons on your way to writing a great essay.

Sentence Agreement: Avoiding Faulty Collective Ownership

12. Sentence Agreement: Avoiding Faulty Collective Ownership

A common error occurs whenever a writer uses wording that suggests that a lot of people own or use just one thing, when really they all own or use their own separate things. This video will explain how to identify and fix this type of error.

Proofreading Your Message for Spelling, Grammar, Accuracy & Clarity

13. Proofreading Your Message for Spelling, Grammar, Accuracy & Clarity

One of the final stages of completing a business message is to proofread the communication for spelling, grammar, accuracy and clarity by completing different review options. Learn how to proofread in this lesson.

Writing Revision: How to Fix Mistakes in Your Writing

14. Writing Revision: How to Fix Mistakes in Your Writing

Writing is an important skill, but revising your writing is also. In this lesson, learn the basics of self-editing, including editing for content and for mechanics, such as grammar and misspellings.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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