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Ch 28: MTLE Elementary Education: The American Civil War

About This Chapter

Brush up on the events that led to the American Civil War by going through this chapter. Use our transcripts to memorize dates and key terms that will be asked about on the MTLE Elementary Education Subtest 3.

MTLE Elementary Education: The American Civil War - Chapter Summary

If you need to refresh your memory about the American Civil War, go to the lessons in this chapter to find out the details about the Missouri Compromise, the Compromise of 1850, Lincoln's election, and Sherman's March to the Sea. Questions about this event on the MTLE Elementary Education Subtest 3 may be fairly comprehensive, so take some extra study time to review these key topics:

  • Bloody Kansas and the Battle of Fort Sumter
  • Major turning points during the Civil War
  • How the Civil War finally came to an end and related events
  • The Reconstruction amendments
  • Results of Reconstruction

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MTLE Elementary Education: The American Civil War Chapter Objectives

The licensure process in the state of Minnesota may require teachers to take several tests, such as the MTLE Elementary Education Subtest 3. This particular assessment is divided into two parts, including science and social studies. The topic of the American Civil War falls into the social studies category, which makes up 43% of the 50 multiple-choice questions on this test.

Within the social studies portion of this test, there are three objectives you will need to meet, and two of those objectives ask you to demonstrate your familiarity with how individuals, groups, and institutions interacted during major events within U.S. history. By going through the lessons about the American Civil War in this chapter, you will be prepared to discuss how this event caused major changes to legal and social institutions.

12 Lessons in Chapter 28: MTLE Elementary Education: The American Civil War
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Henry Clay and the Missouri Compromise of 1820

1. Henry Clay and the Missouri Compromise of 1820

In 1819, Missouri applied for statehood, threatening to tip the balance of senatorial power in favor of the slave states. Find out how Henry Clay resolved the matter for the next 30 years.

President Fillmore and the Compromise of 1850

2. President Fillmore and the Compromise of 1850

Following President Zachary Taylor's death, Millard Fillmore took office. He supported the Compromise of 1850 that added new states from the Mexican cession and attempted to resolve long-standing controversies over slavery.

Bloody Kansas: Causes, Effects and Summary of Events

3. Bloody Kansas: Causes, Effects and Summary of Events

The events in the Kansas territory were a microcosm of the violent forces shaping the United States in the decade of the 1850s, forces that would ultimately lead to a disintegration of the Union itself. This lesson details what has come to be known as Bleeding Kansas and its impact on the issue of slavery.

Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

4. Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

Learn about how Abraham Lincoln's election in the contentious 1860 presidential race set off a domino effect leading to the secession of South Carolina and six other states and the formation of the Confederate States of America.

The Battle of Fort Sumter & the Start of the Civil War

5. The Battle of Fort Sumter & the Start of the Civil War

South Carolina's attack on a U.S. military outpost triggered the American Civil War. Learn more about the Battle of Fort Sumter and the consequences of the fort's surrender to the Confederacy.

Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

6. Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

In 1863, three events proved to be turning points for the American Civil War: the Battle of Chancellorsville, the Battle of Gettysburg and the Siege of Vicksburg. Learn about these Civil War turning points in this lesson.

End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

7. End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

President Lincoln took a gamble and named Ulysses S. Grant as General-in-Chief of the Union army. They devised a plan to finally take Richmond and win the war in 1864. In this lesson, learn about General Grant's controversial tactics.

Sherman's March to the Sea

8. Sherman's March to the Sea

In 1864, General William T. Sherman began his Atlanta campaign. His success assured Lincoln's re-election in 1864. Sherman then began his destructive March to the Sea in order to capture Savannah.

Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

9. Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

Two of the most eventful weeks in American history took place between April 1 and April 15, 1865, during which Richmond (the capital of the Confederacy) fell, General Lee surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse and President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated.

The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

10. The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

Between 1865 and 1870, during the historical era known as Reconstruction, the Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution were ratified to establish political equality for all Americans. Together, they are known as the Reconstruction Amendments.

Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

11. Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

Reconstruction of the South following the American Civil War lasted from 1865-1877 under three presidents. It wasn't welcomed by Southerners, and there were many problems throughout this process. But, was it successful?

Reconstruction in the South: Positive & Negative Effects

12. Reconstruction in the South: Positive & Negative Effects

In this lesson, we'll explore the positive and negative effects of Reconstruction on the people of the South. We'll look at rights and opportunities for African Americans, economic growth, resentment and violence, and the sharecropping system.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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