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Ch 32: MTLE Social Studies: The U.S. as a New Nation

About This Chapter

If you are studying for the MTLE Social Studies exam, be sure to utilize this chapter. In it are helpful details about the United States as a new nation, which is a topic you may see on the exam.

MTLE Social Studies: The U.S. as a New Nation - Chapter Summary

Review the Articles of Confederation and state constitutions after the American Revolution by watching these insightful video lessons as part of your study sessions for the MTLE Social Studies exam. They will also help you learn more about:

  • The Northwest Ordinance
  • The Constitutional Convention
  • Ratification of the Constitution
  • The Bill of Rights
  • President Jefferson's election and presidency
  • The War of 1812 and President Madison
  • James Monroe's presidency
  • John Marshall and the Supreme Court
  • Andrew Jackson vs. the Whig Party

Expanding your knowledge of important historical events in the United States is easy thanks to our entertaining lessons. At the end of each lesson, take a quiz to see what information you retained. This helps you see what areas you need to work on, if any, before taking the actual exam.

10 Lessons in Chapter 32: MTLE Social Studies: The U.S. as a New Nation
Creating State Constitutions After the American Revolution

1. Creating State Constitutions After the American Revolution

After the revolution, the states had to figure out what the rule of the people would be like. The early state constitutions and how they were drafted would inform the process and the resulting document that would become the U.S. Constitution.

The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

2. The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

The Articles of Confederation was the new nation's founding document, but the government established under the Articles was too weak. The new central government had no way of raising revenue and no ability to enforce the commitments made by the states. The Northwest Ordinance paved the way for the growth of the new nation.

The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

3. The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

The Constitutional Convention was intended to amend the Articles of Confederation. Instead, those in attendance set out to found a republic (the likes of which had never been seen), which is still going strong well over 200 years later. To accomplish this task, compromises had to be made. The Great Compromise designed the bicameral congress the U.S. has today.

The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

4. The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

The U.S. Constitution may be one of the most important documents in history, but it wasn't a sure thing. A lot of debate took place. There were many people passionate about ratification, and many people passionate about ensuring it didn't get ratified. The divide over the Constitution shows us the root of political parties in the U.S.

The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

5. The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

The Bill of Rights was pivotal in getting the U.S. Constitution ratified. More importantly, the Bill of Rights guarantees the rights of every citizen of the United States in a way that is nearly unequaled.

President Jefferson's Election and Jeffersonian Democracy

6. President Jefferson's Election and Jeffersonian Democracy

The presidential election of 1800 was a rematch between President John Adams and Vice President Thomas Jefferson. An electoral tie between Jefferson and his running mate forced the House of Representatives to decide. The election inaugurated 24 years of political dominance for the Democratic-Republican Party.

President Madison and the War of 1812

7. President Madison and the War of 1812

Though often overlooked in the annals of American history, the War of 1812 was really a landmark event for a young nation finding its footing amidst a global power struggle. Watch our lesson to follow President James Madison and the War of 1812 into the inky shadows of history.

James Monroe's Presidency: The Monroe Doctrine

8. James Monroe's Presidency: The Monroe Doctrine

Can you imagine a time when there was only one political party in the United States? Find out why James Monroe was one of the nation's most popular presidents during his lifetime and learn about his foreign policy that endured for nearly a century.

John Marshall's Supreme Court During the Virginia Dynasty

9. John Marshall's Supreme Court During the Virginia Dynasty

Think old Supreme Court cases don't relate to your life today? Under the leadership of Chief Justice John Marshall, the Supreme Court made many landmark decisions that shaped the American judicial system - including the rights of citizens - and affect the most important cases in the country to this day.

Andrew Jackson vs. the Whig Party: Rise of Executive Power

10. Andrew Jackson vs. the Whig Party: Rise of Executive Power

In this lesson, we will discuss how Andrew Jackson's administration strengthened executive power as well as the rise of the Whig Party in opposition to Jackson and his policies.

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the MTLE Social Studies: Practice & Study Guide course

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