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Ch 11: MTTC English: American Literature

About This Chapter

Use our lessons to refresh your knowledge of the literature of North America, including Native American legends, the poetry of Phillis Wheatley and the works of Edgar Allan Poe. These videos and quizzes can aid you in correctly answering questions on these topics on the MTTC English exam.

MTTC English: American Literature - Chapter Summary

In this chapter, our instructors help you review information about American literature, from the tales of the Native Americans through the works of great writers in the 19th century. These video lessons and self-assessment quizzes can also help you get ready for MTTC English exam questions on:

  • Writers in early America, including Smith, Winthrop and Williams
  • Phillis Wheatley's life and poems
  • Works of Washington Irving
  • Analysis of the poetry of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  • The dark romantics of American literature
  • Style and works of Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville and Nathaniel Hawthorne

You can watch these lessons as your schedule allows, on a computer, smartphone or tablet. Each video contains a timeline with links to key terms and topics, enabling you to quickly find areas that you want to re-watch. Transcripts accompany each lesson and allow you to read along with the narrator.

MTTC English: American Literature Chapter Objectives

Michigan makes passing the MTTC English exam a requirement for certification to teach the subject. The MTTC English exam is divided into four subareas, covering topics including reading and writing strategies, critical analysis and how to use English skills in other disciplines. Exam questions on the topics in this chapter of the study guide are in the subarea on Literature and Understanding, which makes up 26% of all exam questions.

The MTTC English exam consists entirely of multiple-choice questions. The exam is offered as with a computer-based or paper test. The short quizzes that follow each of our video lessons let you get experience in taking a computer-based multiple-choice test. Additionally, you can gauge your knowledge through these quizzes.

10 Lessons in Chapter 11: MTTC English: American Literature
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Native American and Colonial Literature

1. Native American and Colonial Literature

What types of writing were popular during the early days of the United States? In this lesson, we'll look at three major categories of 17th and 18th century American writing in more detail: Native American oral stories, Puritan writing, and early American political writing.

Native American Oral Tradition: Heritage and Literary Influence

2. Native American Oral Tradition: Heritage and Literary Influence

Native American nations have a rich oral tradition of storytelling. In this lesson, we'll explore the heritage and themes of American Indian stories and look at how they influenced later American literature.

Early American Writers: John Smith, John Winthrop & Roger Williams

3. Early American Writers: John Smith, John Winthrop & Roger Williams

John Smith, John Winthrop, and Roger Williams were early American settlers who influenced the politics and literature of the colonies. In this lesson, we'll look closer at each of these men and their important writings.

Phillis Wheatley: African Poetry in America

4. Phillis Wheatley: African Poetry in America

Phillis Wheatley was a slave and poet in 18th century America who wrote about religion and race. In this lesson, we'll learn more about her and examine one of her poems for the themes of religion and race.

Washington Irving: Biography, Works, and Style

5. Washington Irving: Biography, Works, and Style

This video introduces Washington Irving, the father of American literature. Through his works, like 'Rip Van Winkle' and 'The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,' Irving developed a sophisticated yet satirical style while helping establish the American identity.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: Poem Analysis

6. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: Poem Analysis

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was known as a fireside poet because his poems were read by the fire as a means of entertainment. Learn about how he created American history through the use of musical elements, like rhythm and rhyme scheme.

The Dark Romantics in American Literature

7. The Dark Romantics in American Literature

This video introduces the characteristics of Dark Romanticism, a movement at the end of the Romantic period where literature embodied creepy symbols, horrific themes, and explored the psychological effects of guilt and sin. Authors, such as Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, wrote short stories, poems, and novels that encouraged Americans to see evil in everything.

Edgar Allan Poe: Biography, Works, and Style

8. Edgar Allan Poe: Biography, Works, and Style

This video introduces Edgar Allan Poe, the father of the modern mystery story. Through his works, like 'The Raven' and 'The Tell-Tale Heart,' Poe reflected the characteristics of Dark Romanticism by creating horrific storylines and characters while exploring the dark, irrational depths of the human mind.

Herman Melville: Biography, Works & Style

9. Herman Melville: Biography, Works & Style

Like many great people, Herman Melville was misunderstood during his time. Watch this video to find out why the author of the famous novel 'Moby Dick' died almost as a complete unknown.

Nathaniel Hawthorne: Biography, Works, and Style

10. Nathaniel Hawthorne: Biography, Works, and Style

Who was Nathaniel Hawthorne? Well, besides being a brooding guy with a bit of a dark past, he was one of the most famous writers from early America. Learn more about him and his view of the Puritan belief system in this video.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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