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Ch 26: MTTC English: Literary Devices

About This Chapter

Literary devices are covered individually in this chapter's engaging video lessons for your review. The lessons aim to make related questions on the MTTC English test easier to answer.

MTTC English: Literary Devices - Chapter Summary

These video lessons, which present definitions and examples, will reinforce your understanding of literary devices that may surface on your MTTC English test. You'll find the following potential test topics covered in the chapter:

  • Denotation and connotation
  • Figurative language
  • Catharsis and allegory
  • Understatement and litotes
  • Euphemisms
  • Different points of view
  • The difference between tone and mood
  • Writing voice
  • Word choice
  • Direct and indirect characterization

Use a computer or any connected mobile device to peruse these fun video lessons. To verify your grasp of the different literary devices, you can complete the short practice quiz at the end of each lesson.

MTTC English: Literary Devices Chapter Objectives

The MTTC English test evaluates your familiarity with the English language and its usage to determine your preparedness for licensure as a teacher. The exam's genre and craft of language subarea, which makes up about 30% of your score, is the section in which you could encounter questions about literary devices. All of the test questions are multiple choice.

15 Lessons in Chapter 26: MTTC English: Literary Devices
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Literary Devices: Definition & Examples

1. Literary Devices: Definition & Examples

This lesson studies some of the more common literary devices found in literature. Devices studied include allusion, diction, epigraph, euphemism, foreshadowing, imagery, metaphor/simile, personification, point-of-view and structure.

What Are Connotation and Denotation? - Definitions & Examples

2. What Are Connotation and Denotation? - Definitions & Examples

Discover the difference between a word's denotation and its connotation in this lesson. Explore how authors use both denotation and connotation to add layers of meaning to their work with some literary examples.

Interpreting Figurative Language in Fiction

3. Interpreting Figurative Language in Fiction

In this lesson, we will discuss how to interpret figurative language in fiction. We will explore several types of figurative language and learn how to identify them.

What is Catharsis? - Definition, Examples & History in Literature and Drama

4. What is Catharsis? - Definition, Examples & History in Literature and Drama

In this lesson, learn about catharsis, a purging of feelings that occurs when audiences have strong emotional reactions to a work of literature. Explore examples of literary works which lead to catharsis, including tragedies.

Allegory in Literature: History, Definition & Examples

5. Allegory in Literature: History, Definition & Examples

Learn about allegories and how stories can be used to deliver messages, lessons or even commentaries on big concepts and institutions. Explore how allegories range from straightforward to heavily-veiled and subtle.

Understatement & Litotes: Differences, Definitions & Examples

6. Understatement & Litotes: Differences, Definitions & Examples

In this lesson, explore the use of understatement as a way to draw attention to a specific quality or to add humor. Learn about litotes, a specific form of understatement, and discover examples from literature.

Euphemism: Definition & Examples

7. Euphemism: Definition & Examples

This lesson defines euphemisms, alternate language used in place of offensive language or when discussing taboo topics. Explore some examples of euphemisms in everyday language and well-known examples from literature.

Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

8. Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

Just who is telling this story? In this lesson, we'll look at point of view, or the perspective from which a work is told. We'll review first person, second person and third person points of view.

Understanding Tone and Mood in a Reading Passage

9. Understanding Tone and Mood in a Reading Passage

In this lesson, we will define the literary terms tone and mood. We will then discuss how to identify each of them, as well as how to identify them in small reading passages.

Voice in Writing: Definition & Examples

10. Voice in Writing: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, you'll learn what voice is in writing and how it can be used to make your writing unique. Take a look at some examples and then test your knowledge with a quiz.

Impact of Word Choice on Meaning and Tone

11. Impact of Word Choice on Meaning and Tone

In this lesson, you'll learn how authors can influence the meaning and the emotional effect of a sentence just by choosing the right words or by making references and comparisons. You'll learn the appropriate literary terms along with examples for each.

Tone vs. Mood: Interpreting Meaning In Prose

12. Tone vs. Mood: Interpreting Meaning In Prose

In this lesson, learn the difference between the tone and the mood of a piece of prose. Explore examples of how tone and mood are conveyed by authors through word choice and telling details.

Methods of Characterization in Literature

13. Methods of Characterization in Literature

In this lesson, we'll examine five methods of characterization, including physical description, action, inner thoughts, reactions, and speech. An excerpt from a brief narrative is provided to show how authors use the various methods of characterization to develop characters and create images for the audience.

Direct Characterization: Definition & Examples

14. Direct Characterization: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, you will learn how an author directly establishes characterization. Unlike a lot of other literary devices, direct characterization is fairly easy to spot. Check your understanding of the lesson with a short quiz at the end.

Indirect Characterization: Definition & Examples

15. Indirect Characterization: Definition & Examples

In children's stories, the author might directly describe a character as either 'evil' or 'kind-hearted.' But in more advanced works, the author usually describes how characters behave to show their personality. This is an example of indirect characterization, which is the focus of this lesson.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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