Ch 12: MTTC Political Science: Foundations of U.S. Government

About This Chapter

Dust off your knowledge of the foundations upon which the U.S. government was built when you view this chapter's video lessons. They include brief quizzes that could prepare you for related questions on the MTTC Political Science examination.

MTTC Political Science - Foundations of U.S. Government - Chapter Summary

Get set for the MTTC Political Science examination by watching this chapter's educational videos, which focus largely on the creation of colonial governments, state constitutions, and the Constitutional Convention. For example, you can gather more details about the creation of the New Jersey Plan and the Virginia Plan, and explore the purpose of the Articles of Confederation. This chapter could help you with:

  • Identifying government systems of the thirteen colonies
  • Examining major influences on colonial government
  • Describing governments during the Revolutionary War
  • Outlining the importance of crucial documents such as the Declaration of Independence and the English Bill of Rights
  • Explaining the drafting of state constitutions during the United States' early years and the ratification of the Constitution
  • Discussing the Northwest Ordinance and the Constitutional Convention
  • Identifying the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation

Look to these online video lessons to reinforce your knowledge of the foundations of the U.S. government. With a Web-connected device, you can watch them at your convenience, even when you're on-the-go. You'll be able to use the video tags to easily move from one topic to the next, and you can also submit your relevant questions for expert assistance. We include short lesson quizzes that could indicate whether you're ready related questions you could find on the MTTC Political Science examination.

MTTC Political Science - Foundations of U.S. Government - Chapter Objectives

Once you have reviewed this chapter, you could be prepared to answer those questions that pertain to early U.S. government in the second subarea of the four-part MTTC Political Science examination. Titled, Foundations and Operation of Government in the United States, this subarea amounts to 40% of the approximate test weighting. The test as a whole includes 100 multiple-choice questions, and is part of the qualification process for a political science teaching endorsement in the state of Michigan.

9 Lessons in Chapter 12: MTTC Political Science: Foundations of U.S. Government
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Systems of Government in the Thirteen Colonies

1. Systems of Government in the Thirteen Colonies

The 13 colonies each had their own systems of government, but all of them worked in similar ways. Explore the various systems of colonial government, and test your understanding with a brief quiz.

Influences on the Emergence of Colonial Government

2. Influences on the Emergence of Colonial Government

While the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were revolutionary documents, their ideas were not pulled out of thin air. This lesson shows some of the earlier documents that helped guide those important texts.

Colonial Governments During the Revolutionary War

3. Colonial Governments During the Revolutionary War

In this lesson, you will explore not one, not two, but three different attempts at colonial government by Americans during the Revolutionary War. Discover their impacts and test your understanding with a brief quiz.

Influential Documents for the U.S. Constitution

4. Influential Documents for the U.S. Constitution

The U.S. Constitution is a very important document, but the ideas within reflect centuries of innovative ideas about government and society. Explore various documents that influenced the U.S. Constitution.

Creating State Constitutions After the American Revolution

5. Creating State Constitutions After the American Revolution

After the revolution, the states had to figure out what the rule of the people would be like. The early state constitutions and how they were drafted would inform the process and the resulting document that would become the U.S. Constitution.

The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

6. The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

The Articles of Confederation was the new nation's founding document, but the government established under the Articles was too weak. The new central government had no way of raising revenue and no ability to enforce the commitments made by the states. The Northwest Ordinance paved the way for the growth of the new nation.

Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion

7. Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion

The Articles of Confederation were too weak to create an effective government for the new nation. In this lesson, discover how Shays' Rebellion proved that the national government needed to strengthen.

The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

8. The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

The Constitutional Convention was intended to amend the Articles of Confederation. Instead, those in attendance set out to found a republic (the likes of which had never been seen), which is still going strong well over 200 years later. To accomplish this task, compromises had to be made. The Great Compromise designed the bicameral congress the U.S. has today.

The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

9. The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

The U.S. Constitution may be one of the most important documents in history, but it wasn't a sure thing. A lot of debate took place. There were many people passionate about ratification, and many people passionate about ensuring it didn't get ratified. The divide over the Constitution shows us the root of political parties in the U.S.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Other Chapters

Other chapters within the MTTC Political Science (010): Practice & Study Guide course

Support