Ch 14: MTTC Reading: Teaching Comprehension

About This Chapter

With this chapter you will review the different strategies that can be used to teach reading comprehension to students. Once you've completed this chapter you should be ready for related material on the MTTC Reading exam.

MTTC Reading: Teaching Comprehension - Chapter Summary

These short, engaging lesson videos were assembled to help individuals improve their understanding of the processes of comprehending reading selections and how these processes can be instilled in students. When you leave this chapter, you will be ready to take on any MTTC Reading test questions about the following:

  • Techniques of teaching reading comprehension
  • How to draw conclusions from a reading
  • Making predictions about a reading
  • The use of visualization
  • Applying reading selection ideas to other situations
  • Identifying cause and effect in reading selections
  • Hands-on, expository, collaborative and interactive strategies of instruction
  • The use of advance organizers in the classroom

Test your understanding of these lessons by completing the lesson quizzes, and then use your quiz results to identify subjects you haven't mastered. Use video tags to return to the locations of the lessons that discuss the topics you don't understand. For an alternative review you can read over the lesson transcripts that will present you with written overviews of the lessons that highlight in bold the key terms of the chapter.

8 Lessons in Chapter 14: MTTC Reading: Teaching Comprehension
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Teach Reading Comprehension

1. How to Teach Reading Comprehension

Teaching reading comprehension requires instilling in the learner the use of several strategies and skills. This lesson will focus on cognitive skills and notation strategies that will enhance reading comprehension.

Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

2. Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

When someone drops hints, we're able to draw conclusions about what they're really trying to say. Similarly, as readers, we use clues to draw conclusions from texts. This lesson explains how to draw conclusions and how to teach this important skill.

How to Make Predictions Based on Information from a Reading Selection

3. How to Make Predictions Based on Information from a Reading Selection

Making predictions when reading is an important reading comprehension strategy. In this lesson, we will discuss why it is important and how to model and practice it.

Reading Strategies Using Visualization

4. Reading Strategies Using Visualization

In this lesson, we will define visualization. We will then discuss why this step is important, how we can visualize, and when you should visualize. Finally, we will look at a sample from a poem and practice visualizing.

How to Apply Ideas from a Reading Selection to Other Situations

5. How to Apply Ideas from a Reading Selection to Other Situations

Applying what we learn from books to other situations in life helps us grow and improve. This lesson demonstrates how to apply ideas from a text to other situations and how to teach this important skill to readers.

How to Find Cause and Effect in a Reading Selection

6. How to Find Cause and Effect in a Reading Selection

Cause and effect structures can be used to describe how an action takes place. This lesson will discuss how to find this structure within a reading selection.

Instructional Strategies: Hands-On, Interactive, Expository & Collaborative

7. Instructional Strategies: Hands-On, Interactive, Expository & Collaborative

In this lesson, we will use the fictional Academy of Magic to illustrate four types of instructional strategies that teachers use in the classroom: expository instruction, interactive instruction, hands-on instruction and collaborative instruction.

Advance Organizers in the Classroom: Teaching Strategies & Advantages

8. Advance Organizers in the Classroom: Teaching Strategies & Advantages

An advance organizer is a very useful tool for teachers to help students understand, retain and remember new learning material. In this lesson, we define an advance organizer and discuss examples and benefits of use in the classroom.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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