Ch 32: MTTC Social Studies (Secondary): American Imperialism

About This Chapter

Study American imperialism by exploring the short video lessons in this chapter. Strengthening your knowledge of this significant occurrence in history can help you better prepare for the MTTC Social Studies (Secondary) assessment.

MTTC Social Studies (Secondary): American Imperialism - Chapter Summary

Watch the videos in this chapter to get an in-depth analysis of American imperialism as you study for the MTTC Social Studies (Secondary) assessment. The lessons are designed to help you answer questions on the exam that address the following:

  • American imperialism and the reasons it occurred
  • Causes, goals and results of the Spanish-American War
  • American imperialism in Hawaii, China & the Philippines
  • Imperialism in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Official position, isolation and more of the U.S. in World War I
  • How World War I change after America got involved

The videos in this chapter are designed to help you comprehend the concepts by providing detailed definitions, examples and more. Full transcripts are available that allow you to review the lessons in written form. You can also access easily identifiable vocabulary words in both the videos and transcripts.

Objectives of the MTTC Social Studies (Secondary): American Imperialism Chapter

A primary objective of this chapter is to provide you with resources that can help you pass the MTTC Social Studies (Secondary) assessment. The topics covered in this American imperialism chapter are found in the U.S. history subarea of the assessment, which constitutes approximately 18% of the total test. In order to pass the exam, you need a score of 220, after which you can add the social studies subject area to your Michigan teaching certificate and teach it in the secondary-level classroom.

Taking the test requires answering 100 multiple-choice questions on paper or a computer. You can watch the video lessons in this chapter then take self-assessment quizzes to practice answering questions formatted similarly to those you'll see on the exam. If you're stuck on any quiz questions, utilize convenient links that send you back to related topics within the video lessons. A practice chapter exam can be used to reinforce the concepts learned in all the lessons.

6 Lessons in Chapter 32: MTTC Social Studies (Secondary): American Imperialism
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
American Imperialism: Definition, Reasons & Rising International Power

1. American Imperialism: Definition, Reasons & Rising International Power

When George Washington left office, he warned against getting drawn into global issues, yet just over 100 years later, the U.S. began its rise to become the dominant world power. What started this rise of American Imperialism?

The Spanish-American War: Causes, Goals & Results

2. The Spanish-American War: Causes, Goals & Results

The Spanish-American war was a new kind of war involvement for the U.S. It was not for freedom, it was not an internal conflict. It was fought over expansion and the idea of spreading American influence in the Caribbean and in the Philippines.

American Imperialism in Hawaii, China & the Philippines

3. American Imperialism in Hawaii, China & the Philippines

American imperialism had a major effect on the world. In this lesson, find out how a nation became a part of the U.S. for almost 50 years and how one kingdom became a U.S. state. The effect of U.S. imperialism in Asia and the Pacific had a long-lasting and far-reaching effect that we can still see today!

American Imperialism in Latin America & the Caribbean

4. American Imperialism in Latin America & the Caribbean

Around the turn of the 20th century, the United States entered a period of non-colonial imperial expansion throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. Learn about the short-term and long-term effects of some of these policies in this video lesson.

The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

5. The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

The United States' best option was to stay out of World War I. They had nothing to gain from getting involved. So, they tried to stay neutral, but as American interests started to lean toward the Allied Powers, many events happened to give the States the final push to enter the war.

American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

6. American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

As much as the U.S. wanted to stay neutral during World War I, it proved impossible. This meant the U.S. had to raise the forces and money to wage war. Find out how Americans played their part in WWI in this lesson.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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Other chapters within the MTTC Social Studies (Secondary)(084): Practice & Study Guide course

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