Ch 73: MTTC Social Studies (Secondary): Social Science Research Methods

About This Chapter

The content in this chapter looks at various facets of the research methods used in the social sciences. The information is presented via video lessons to give you a fun review of MTTC Social Studies (Secondary) test content.

MTTC Social Studies (Secondary): Social Science Research Methods - Chapter Summary

Refresh your memory on key issues that involve conducting, evaluating and presenting social science research to make sure you're ready for relevant MTTC Social Studies (Secondary) test items. These lessons prepare you to answer questions regarding:

  • Archival research and meta-analysis
  • Common kinds of research design
  • The development of hypotheses and null hypotheses
  • Differences between case studies, surveys and interviews
  • Inferential vs. descriptive statistics
  • How typed and published reports are different
  • The process of evaluating reasoning
  • Approaches to assessing explanations and uncertainty in texts
  • Introducing unclear ideas and interpreting context
  • Determining a text's central idea
  • How to read various graphical representations
  • The major components of a journal article

Use a handheld device or computer to look at these videos from any place where you're able to get on the Web. You can confirm your grasp of the issues by taking the lessons' short practice quizzes.

MTTC Social Studies (Secondary): Social Science Research Methods Chapter Objectives

The MTTC Social Studies (Secondary) test decides whether your knowledge aligns with teacher certification standards in Michigan. The section of the exam concerned with social science research methods is the Inquiry, Interdisciplinary Perspectives and Public Discourse subarea. This exam part includes only multiple-choice questions and they collectively make up about 10% of your score.

15 Lessons in Chapter 73: MTTC Social Studies (Secondary): Social Science Research Methods
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Using Archival Research & Secondary Records to Collect Social Research Data

1. Using Archival Research & Secondary Records to Collect Social Research Data

This lesson explores the idea of what happens when researchers already have information and data that they can study. You'll get the chance to look at descriptions of archival and meta-analysis research.

Types of Research Design

2. Types of Research Design

There are questions to be answered in all areas of psychology. How are these questions answered by professionals in the field? This lesson covers several different options researchers can use to approach such questions.

Formulating the Research Hypothesis and Null Hypothesis

3. Formulating the Research Hypothesis and Null Hypothesis

After figuring out what you want to study, what is the next step in designing a research experiment? You, the researcher, write a hypothesis and null hypothesis. This lesson explores the process and terminology used in writing a hypothesis and null hypothesis.

How Observational & Field Research Are Used to Collect Data

4. How Observational & Field Research Are Used to Collect Data

Psychologists have many different options for where and how to do research. Watch this video to learn more about the difference in field and lab research and the advantages and disadvantages of observational research

Surveys, Interviews, and Case Studies

5. Surveys, Interviews, and Case Studies

Researchers often have to decide how to collect data for their research. Should they ask people questions or observe them directly? This lesson will differentiate between three methods of data collection: surveys, interviews, and case studies.

Descriptive & Inferential Statistics: Definition, Differences & Examples

6. Descriptive & Inferential Statistics: Definition, Differences & Examples

Descriptive and inferential statistics each give different insights into the nature of the data gathered. One alone cannot give the whole picture. Together, they provide a powerful tool for both description and prediction.

Published & Typed Reports: Differences & Examples

7. Published & Typed Reports: Differences & Examples

What is the process after you have completed your research? In this lesson, we will explore the differences between a finished piece of research and a published piece of research, why it is important, and the process of how it is accomplished.

Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

8. Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

Being able to effectively evaluate reasoning can be helpful to you as you develop your own deductive and inductive reasoning skills and put those skills to work in persuasive essays. This lesson sheds some light on how to evaluate reasoning.

Strategies to Evaluate Explanations in Texts

9. Strategies to Evaluate Explanations in Texts

In this lesson we will use the CER Framework as a strategy to evaluate explanations in historical texts. By using the CLAIM and EVIDENCE provided by the author, and the reader's own REASONING (CER), we can more easily choose the best explanation.

Evaluating & Acknowledging Uncertainty in Historical Texts

10. Evaluating & Acknowledging Uncertainty in Historical Texts

Explore the challenges facing historians who write stories about the past. Discover advantages and difficulties in writing history and learn strategies used to account for ambiguities in historical texts.

Hedging Strategies for Presenting Unclear Ideas

11. Hedging Strategies for Presenting Unclear Ideas

We often see negative hedging strategies in politics, but they're not always tools of evasion or dishonesty. In research writing, hedging strategies can help you present complex ideas responsibly without misleading your readers. In this lesson, we'll learn techniques for writing about such unclear ideas.

How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

12. How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the theme or central idea of a text, and you'll get some specific examples of themes from famous stories.

Interpreting Graphical Representations

13. Interpreting Graphical Representations

After watching this video lesson, you will be able to quickly and easily read and interpret any line and bar graph. You will be able to gather important information by just looking at one of these graphs.

Interpreting Works in Context

14. Interpreting Works in Context

In this lesson, we will learn how to interpret a written work in its context. We will explore the historical context, biographical context, context of language and form, and context of the reader.

Practice Analyzing and Interpreting a Journal

15. Practice Analyzing and Interpreting a Journal

Interpreting a journal article can seem daunting, but recognizing common format elements and asking specific questions will help you break it down into understandable pieces that can be analyzed.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the MTTC Social Studies (Secondary)(084): Practice & Study Guide course

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