Ch 18: NES Essential Academic Skills Writing: Writing Strategy

About This Chapter

Watch video lessons and take practice quizzes on writing strategies. Use these resources to study for the National Evaluation Series (NES) Essential Academic Skills Writing test.

NES Essential Academic Skills Writing: Writing Strategy - Chapter Summary

Brush up on writing strategy for the NES Writing exam with these study tools. You'll cover writing topics you'll be asked about on test questions as you improve your writing skills for the written assignment portion of the exam. The lessons in this chapter will cover the following topics:

  • Engaging readers by developing an appeal
  • Writing for your audience
  • Main idea, thesis statement and topic sentences
  • Avoiding redundancy in writing
  • Tone, purpose and audience
  • Developing an essay topic
  • Practice essays

This chapter is broken down into a series of brief video lessons. Review the lessons as many times as you'd like or use the video tags to skip to specific topics. Test what you've learned with our interactive quizzes and the chapter exam.

NES Essential Academic Skills Writing: Writing Strategy Objectives

The NES Writing test is a requirement for teacher certification in many states. You'll answer 36 multiple-choice questions and complete one written essay. The multiple-choice questions make up 75% of your total score, with the writing assignment accounting for the other 25%.

This chapter on writing strategy will help you answer questions on purpose, audience, development and organization in the multiple-choice section of the test, as well as assist you with your written assignment.

8 Lessons in Chapter 18: NES Essential Academic Skills Writing: Writing Strategy
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Engage Readers by Picking and Developing an Appeal

1. How to Engage Readers by Picking and Developing an Appeal

There are three types of appeals that you can use in your persuasive writing to make your arguments more effective. In this video, you'll learn about logical, ethical, and emotional appeals as well as how to use them.

Writing for Your Audience

2. Writing for Your Audience

By understanding some fundamental characteristics about your audience, you can write more effectively and be in better control of how well your writing is received by that audience. This video explains the basic points that you should consider in order to provide more informative and more persuasive essays for your readers.

Writing: Main Idea, Thesis Statement & Topic Sentences

3. Writing: Main Idea, Thesis Statement & Topic Sentences

What exactly is your essay about? Writing great thesis statements and topic sentences that align with your main idea will help readers to understand the theme, ideas, and central focus of your essay.

What is a Thesis Statement?

4. What is a Thesis Statement?

Before we can talk about how to write a great thesis statement, you need to be able to identify a great thesis when you see one. Contrary to what you may have been taught, a thesis is so much more than just the last sentence of the opening paragraph of an essay.

How to Avoid Redundancy in Your Writing

5. How to Avoid Redundancy in Your Writing

Does your writing redundantly say the same thing twice? Is it full of unnecessary and inessential repetition of things you've already said before? Learn how to fix it here!

Tone, Audience & Purpose in Essays

6. Tone, Audience & Purpose in Essays

What is tone? How do you create a tone within an essay? Watch this video lesson to learn how writing with a specific audience and purpose in mind will help you to achieve an appropriate tone.

Developing the Essay Topic

7. Developing the Essay Topic

The backbone of any essay is a strong and engaging main idea. Learn how to turn an essay prompt into a well-developed topic by watching this video lesson.

Practicing Essay Writing to Get Better at Writing

8. Practicing Essay Writing to Get Better at Writing

It can be tough to practice your essay-writing skills on your own without a teacher's feedback. With some time and practice (and by using this game plan), you'll be on your way to practicing, evaluating and improving your writing.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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