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Ch 8: Non-literary Texts: MTLE Middle Level Communication Arts/Literature

About This Chapter

Become more familiar with the information you need to know about non-literary texts for the MTLE Middle Level Communication Arts/Literature test. Throughout the chapter, use our quizzes to practice answering questions like those on the exam.

MTLE Middle Level Communication Arts/Literature: Non-literary Texts - Chapter Summary

Instructors will guide you through video lessons in preparation for the MTLE Middle Level Communication Arts/Literature test. Each lesson in this chapter will cover topics related to non-literary texts that are essential for the examination. The lessons emphasize the following:

  • The characteristics, organization and structure of non-literary texts
  • Determining the main purpose and audience
  • Using and assessing information from non-literary texts
  • The difference between facts and opinions
  • Assessing evidence as well as the credibility of sources
  • Evaluating and using rhetorical devices
  • Textual graphics and visual graphics

Use the lessons in this chapter to get ready for questions about non-literary texts on the MTLE Middle Level Communication Arts/Literature test. After the lessons, you can continue preparing for exam day with multiple-choice quizzes.

9 Lessons in Chapter 8: Non-literary Texts: MTLE Middle Level Communication Arts/Literature
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Recognize Characteristics of Non-literary Texts

1. How to Recognize Characteristics of Non-literary Texts

Literature contains two types of literary styles: fiction and nonfiction. Learn what characterizes a non-literary text and how it plays a role in literature and your everyday life.

Organizational Structure & Non-literary Text Comprehension

2. Organizational Structure & Non-literary Text Comprehension

Comprehension of non-literary texts relies on an awareness of structure and organization, which often enhances the understanding of cause and effect in the text.

Identifying a Non-literary Text's Main Idea, Purpose & Audience

3. Identifying a Non-literary Text's Main Idea, Purpose & Audience

In this lesson, you will learn how to identify some aspects of a non-literary text, including the main idea, the author's purpose, and the intended audience.

How to Use Information from Non-literary Texts

4. How to Use Information from Non-literary Texts

This lesson defines the term non-literary text, gives examples of the different types of non-literary texts, and gives strategies to use in analyzing non-literary texts by confirming facts, gaining knowledge, developing skills, and performing tasks.

Facts vs. Opinions: Examples, Games & Activities

5. Facts vs. Opinions: Examples, Games & Activities

Being able to discriminate between facts and opinions is an important reading skill elementary students need to understand. But how do you tell the difference between the two? Luckily, there's a straightforward way to teach fact and opinion. That's a fact. Trust me.

Assessing Evidence in Informational Writing

6. Assessing Evidence in Informational Writing

It's important to know what you're reading. In this lesson, we're going to examine the evidence in informational texts to learn whether it's valid or not.

Rhetorical Device: Definition & Examples

7. Rhetorical Device: Definition & Examples

Rhetorical devices are used in language to communicate effectively and persuade. Here you'll discover more about rhetorical devices and learn how to put some of them to use in some persuasion of your own.

Evaluating Rhetorical Devices in Writing

8. Evaluating Rhetorical Devices in Writing

In this lesson, we will study a variety of rhetorical devices that commonly appear in written texts. We will look at rhetoric on the level of sounds, words, sentences, and figures of speech.

Using Visuals to Present Data: Textual Graphics vs. Visual Graphics

9. Using Visuals to Present Data: Textual Graphics vs. Visual Graphics

Textual and visual graphics can aid in visually presenting data to a business audience. You must first identify the type of data you will be presenting and then decide whether it is details, patterns or relationships being communicated.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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