Ch 13: Nonfiction Text Analysis

About This Chapter

Lessons in this chapter make it easy for students to fully grasp the process of analyzing nonfiction text. How to draw inferences, determine the text structure of a passage and interpret graphics are just a few of the topics covered in this chapter.

Nonfiction Text Analysis - Chapter Summary

Students interested in exceling in their high school level English courses often are required to understand how to analyze nonfiction text. Expert instructors have developed entertaining lessons that make it easy for students to grasp this concept. This chapter looks at the process of analyzing informational, expository, persuasive and functional texts. It also provides summaries and analyses of well-known works. Upon completion of the lessons, students will be prepared to do the following:

  • Draw inferences from informational texts
  • Identify implied main ideas
  • Use transitions to determine the text structure of a passage
  • Interpret graphics in expository, persuasive and functional texts
  • Analyze the content and style of the pamphlets Common Sense and The Crisis in America
  • Discuss Henry David Thoreau's Walden and Civil Disobedience
  • Identify the themes and purpose of Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural address
  • Summarize and analyze the Bill of Rights

6 Lessons in Chapter 13: Nonfiction Text Analysis
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Determine the Text Structure of a Passage Using Transitions

1. How to Determine the Text Structure of a Passage Using Transitions

Text structure refers to the way a writer organizes their text. Learn how to use a passage's transitions to determine its structure, including chronological structures, comparing and contrasting subjects, cause and effect passages, and descriptive pieces.

Thomas Paine: Common Sense and The Crisis

2. Thomas Paine: Common Sense and The Crisis

Thomas Paine wrote Common Sense and The American Crisis, pamphlets that ignited the American people's will to revolt against England for their independence. Review the main points of Paine's pamphlets and his motive in writing these revolutionary works.

Henry David Thoreau's Walden: Summary and Analysis

3. Henry David Thoreau's Walden: Summary and Analysis

Published in 1854 by Henry David Thoreau, Walden is one of the most prominent pieces of transcendentalist American literature. Discover Thoreau's motivations for writing Walden, as well as the main themes of the book.

Henry David Thoreau's Civil Disobedience: Summary and Analysis

4. Henry David Thoreau's Civil Disobedience: Summary and Analysis

Transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau wrote the essay, 'Civil Disobedience,' to express opposition to American imperialism and slavery. Analyze this essay to understand Thoreau's motivation for writing it, his instructions for civil disobedience, and his perspective on America's identity. Recognize the influence of Thoreau's essay on prominent civil rights activists, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address: Themes & Purpose

5. Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address: Themes & Purpose

President Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural address packed a series of powerful messages into a weighty 6-7 minute speech. See the themes and purpose of this speech in addressing the ongoing Civil War, and the response of the public to his message.

The Bill of Rights: Summary & Analysis

6. The Bill of Rights: Summary & Analysis

The thirteen American colonies announced their independence from Great Britain and became the first thirteen states in the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. Learn about the Bill of Rights, history, summary, and analyzes its importance.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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