Ch 32: Nuclear Reactions in Chemistry

About This Chapter

Review the basics of nuclear reactions with this chapter's bite-sized chemistry lessons. The chapter offers you a quick way to review nuclear chemistry concepts for exams, homework, class assignments, projects or fun.

Nuclear Reactions in Chemistry - Chapter Summary

Check out this online science chapter to improve your understanding of nuclear reactions in chemistry. Through a series of engaging and informative lessons, you'll review the fundamentals of concepts like radioactive decay, carbon dating, radiation, half-life and the products of nuclear reactions. Each lesson comes with a short quiz to help you reinforce your understanding of these nuclear chemistry terms. If you have any questions about the material, just use the chapter's Ask the Expert feature. When you're finished with the lessons and quizzes, you should be able to:

  • Evaluate examples of nuclear energy
  • Compare types of radioactive decay
  • Balance nuclear equations
  • Predict nuclear reaction products
  • Explain the applications of nuclear chemistry
  • Discuss carbon dating, radiometric dating and half-life
  • Recognize the causes and effects of radiation
  • Tell how radioactive isotopes can track biological molecules
  • Identify background radiation causes
  • Assess safety and health concerns regarding nuclear power plants and radioactive waste

7 Lessons in Chapter 32: Nuclear Reactions in Chemistry
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Nuclear Energy? - Definition & Examples

1. What is Nuclear Energy? - Definition & Examples

You've probably heard of nuclear energy. But what is it? And what is the difference between fusion and fission? This lesson will answer your questions about this exciting form of energy that involves atoms and their nuclei.

What is Carbon Dating? - Definition & Overview

2. What is Carbon Dating? - Definition & Overview

Ever wondered how scientists know the age of old bones in an ancient site or how old a scrap of linen is? The technique used is called carbon dating, and in this lesson we will learn what this is and how it is used. A quiz will test how much we have learned.

Radiometric Dating: Methods, Uses & the Significance of Half-Life

3. Radiometric Dating: Methods, Uses & the Significance of Half-Life

Radiometric dating is used to estimate the age of rocks and other objects based on the fixed decay rate of radioactive isotopes. Learn about half-life and how it is used in different dating methods, such as uranium-lead dating and radiocarbon dating, in this video lesson.

What is Radiation? - Definition, Causes & Effects

4. What is Radiation? - Definition, Causes & Effects

Learn about the reality and pervasiveness of radiation in our world. Discover some of the causes of radiation, and find out about the risks and rewards of harnessing it for our use.

How Radioactive Isotopes Track Biological Molecules

5. How Radioactive Isotopes Track Biological Molecules

Radioactive isotopes can be used to track atoms and label biological molecules. This lesson explores how this can be applied to microbiology to learn more about the way a cell works.

Background Radiation: Definition, Causes & Examples

6. Background Radiation: Definition, Causes & Examples

This lesson will define background radiation, explain how it is measured, discuss some of the sources and examples of background radiation, and briefly consider the risk to humans. A short quiz will follow.

Risks of Nuclear Power Plants and Radioactive Waste: Safety and Health Concerns

7. Risks of Nuclear Power Plants and Radioactive Waste: Safety and Health Concerns

Nuclear power can generate electricity without greenhouse gas emissions. However, there are concerns about its safety. Learn about the safety and health concerns associated with the threat of nuclear meltdowns, as well as the challenges involved in storing radioactive waste.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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