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Ch 7: NY Regents - American Civil War & Reconstruction: Tutoring Solution

About This Chapter

The American Civil War and Reconstruction chapter of this NY Regents Exam - US History and Government Tutoring Solution is a flexible and affordable path to learning about the American Civil War and reconstruction for the NY Regents Exam. These simple and fun video lessons are each about five minutes long and they teach all of the battles and events of the American Civil War and reconstruction required in a typical NY Regents Exam US history and government review course.

How it works:

  • Begin your assignment or other NY Regents Exam US history and government work.
  • Identify the American Civil War and reconstruction concepts that you're stuck on.
  • Find fun videos on the topics you need to understand.
  • Press play, watch and learn!
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • As needed, submit a question to one of our instructors for personalized support.

Who's it for?

This chapter of our NY Regents Exam US history and government tutoring solution will benefit any student who is trying to learn about the American Civil War and reconstruction and earn passing scores on the NY Regents Exam. This resource can help students including those who:

  • Struggle with understanding the Emancipation Proclamation, Sherman's march to the sea, Lincoln's assassination, Andrew Johnson's impeachment, reconstruction amendments, Homestead Act or any other American Civil War and reconstruction topic
  • Have limited time for studying
  • Want a cost effective way to supplement their history learning for the NY Regents Exam
  • Prefer learning history visually
  • Find themselves failing or close to failing their American Civil War and reconstruction unit
  • Cope with ADD or ADHD
  • Want to get ahead in US history and government
  • Don't have access to their history teacher outside of class

Why it works:

  • Engaging Tutors: We make learning about the American Civil War and reconstruction simple and fun.
  • Cost Efficient: For less than 20% of the cost of a private tutor, you'll have unlimited access 24/7.
  • Consistent High Quality: Unlike a live NY Regents Exam US history and government tutor, these video lessons are thoroughly reviewed.
  • Convenient: Imagine a tutor as portable as your laptop, tablet or smartphone. Learn about the American Civil War and reconstruction for the NY Regents Exam on the go!
  • Learn at Your Pace: You can pause and rewatch lessons as often as you'd like, until you master the material.

Learning Objectives

  • Compare and contrast the Northern and Southern advantages in the Civil War.
  • Discuss the Emancipation Proclamation.
  • Take a look at the turning points of the Civil War.
  • Learn about General Grant and the march toward Richmond.
  • Discuss Sherman's March to the Sea.
  • Examine Lincoln's assassination and Lee's surrender.
  • Become familiar with Lincoln's Reconstruction plans.
  • Describe Andrew Johnson's attempts to continue Lincoln's Reconstruction plan.
  • Explain why Andrew Johnson was impeached.
  • Take a look at the election of Ulysses S. Grant.
  • Understand the Reconstruction Amendments.
  • Learn how Reconstruction affected African Americans.
  • Describe life in the South following the Civil War.
  • Discuss the Transcontinental Railroad, the Homestead Act and women's suffrage.
  • Take a look at the election of 1876.
  • List the successes and failures of Reconstruction.

20 Lessons in Chapter 7: NY Regents - American Civil War & Reconstruction: Tutoring Solution
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

1. Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

Leaders on both sides thought of the Civil War that began with an attack on Ft. Sumter in 1861 would end quickly, but each side had numerous advantages that would enable both armies to prolong the war. Compare these advantages of the Northern and Southern sides and each side's ability to fight a longer, bloodier war than most had envisioned.

The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

2. The Emancipation Proclamation: Creation, Context and Legacy

On Jan. 1, 1863, more than three million slaves held mostly in southern states in America were freed by President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. Learn about the creation, context, legacy, and explore contemporary controversies of the Emancipation Proclamation.

End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

3. End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

Learn how the Civil War ended and how General Ulysses S. Grant began the march toward Richmond, Va. Explore General Grant's successes and failures in the battles of 1864, and how President Abraham Lincoln resisted calls to replace Grant.

Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

4. Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

Three battles in 1863 were turning points in the Civil War. Learn how the battles at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and Vicksburg during the third year of the war and explore the decisions of generals on both sides.

Sherman's March to the Sea

5. Sherman's March to the Sea

In 1864, General Ulysses S. Grant ordered General William Tecumseh Sherman to capture Atlanta, Georgia, before heading toward the coast in an attempt to secure President Lincoln's reelection and end the Civil War. Learn more about the path of destruction Sherman and his men carved from Atlanta to Savannah, infamously known as Sherman's March to the Sea, and its effects on the 1864 election.

Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

6. Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

Several significant events in American history took place in the last two weeks of the Civil War in 1865. Explore the history of Richmond Falls and learn about General Lee's surrender and President Lincoln's Assassination.

President Lincoln's Legacy: Plans for a Reconstructed Union

7. President Lincoln's Legacy: Plans for a Reconstructed Union

With the end of the Civil War, there came a resounding need for some sort of reconstructed Union. President Lincoln took that task on headfirst, as he established the Ten Percent Plan to help the Southern states enter back into the Union peacefully. Learn about Lincoln's plans to reconstruct the Union and the competition that this president faced by the Radical Republicans.

President Andrew Johnson: Attempts to Continue Lincoln's Reconstruction Plan

8. President Andrew Johnson: Attempts to Continue Lincoln's Reconstruction Plan

Taking over from President Lincoln following his assassination, President Andrew Johnson built upon Lincoln's moderate reconstruction plan, handled the southern border crisis of the time, and sought to defend states' rights. Explore the strengths and weaknesses of Johnson's attempts at continuing Lincoln's plan for the reconstruction of the Union in the wake of the Civil War.

The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson: Conflict Between President and Congress

9. The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson: Conflict Between President and Congress

Andrew Johnson was the first US president to be impeached. Learn about the conflict between President Johnson and Congress that led to his impeachment. Review the 14th Amendment, Military Reconstruction Act, and the Tenure of Office Act. Explore the actions of Congress and how they passed laws without President Johnson's support.

President Ulysses S. Grant: Election, Successes and Corruption

10. President Ulysses S. Grant: Election, Successes and Corruption

General Ulysses S. Grant, Union hero of the U.S. Civil War, won the presidential election in 1868 and served two terms. Examine Grant's successes (fighting to protect civil rights), failures (making decisions without consulting his cabinet), and corruption (members of seven departments, including his own vice president, were involved in at least 11 scandals) that clouded his tenure as president.

The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

11. The Reconstruction Amendments: The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments

The historical era known as Reconstruction (1865-1870) saw the ratification of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments of the U.S. Constitution, which address slavery, citizenship and voting rights. Learn more about the 13th Amendment (abolition of slavery), 14th Amendment (granting citizenship, due process, and equal protection under the law), and 15th Amendment (early voting rights), and how they helped begin the process of developing political equality for African Americans after the Civil War.

Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

12. Reconstruction's Effects on African Americans: Politics, Education and Economy

Reconstruction's effects on African Americans was positive, with opportunities for self-improvement and advancement. Study the lives of four black leaders and their influence on politics, education, and economy in this period of American history.

Life in the South After the Civil War

13. Life in the South After the Civil War

Learn about life in the South after the Civil War. This lesson will explore the problems in the South after the war, sharecropping and convict leasing, the Redeemers and the Plessy vs Ferguson case, and paramilitary groups.

Transcontinental Railroad, Homestead Act and Women's Suffrage

14. Transcontinental Railroad, Homestead Act and Women's Suffrage

In addition to the Civil War, Reconstruction and the Manifest Destiny, three other important events were evolving in the U.S. in the mid- to late-19th century. Discover the Homestead Act, which encouraged settlers to move west; the Transcontinental Railroad project which further enabled expansion to the West; and the fight to secure women's rights to vote, also known as Women's Suffrage.

The End of Reconstruction and the Election of 1876

15. The End of Reconstruction and the Election of 1876

Learn about the end of Reconstruction and how it is related to the election of 1876. This lesson explores what led to the end of Reconstruction, the shift in politics, the Panic of 1873, supreme court cases of the time, and the election of 1876.

Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

16. Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

The Reconstruction period spanned 1865 - 1877, where the Republicans worked to repair the South after the Civil War. Learn about the goals, successes and failures of the Reconstruction period.

Black Friday Scandal of 1869: History & Explanation

17. Black Friday Scandal of 1869: History & Explanation

The Black Friday Scandal occurred in 1869 under the presidency of Ulysses S. Grant. Learn the history and details of the scandal that involved the U.S. Treasury and the price of gold on Wall Street.

Charles Evans Hughes: Biography & Quotes

18. Charles Evans Hughes: Biography & Quotes

In this lesson you will learn about Charles Evans Hughes (1862-1948). He was an American statesmen and jurist who served as an attorney, governor of New York, two-time member of the Supreme Court, and secretary of state under Presidents Harding and Coolidge.

Charles Sumner in Reconstruction: History & Explanation

19. Charles Sumner in Reconstruction: History & Explanation

Senator Charles Sumner was a staunch advocate for Black rights during Reconstruction. Meet Charles Sumner, learn about the Freedmen's Bureau, examine his Civil Rights Act of 1866, and explore his role in President Johnson's impeachment.

The Civil Rights Act of 1866 Summary

20. The Civil Rights Act of 1866 Summary

In the years following the Civil War, the United States was working to heal the country and pass new laws to protect its citizens. In this lesson, you will learn about the Civil Rights Act of 1866.

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