Ch 2: NY Regents - The American Revolution: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The American Revolution chapter of this NY Regents Exam US History and Government Help and Review course is the simplest way to master the American Revolution for the NY Regents Exam. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of the American Revolution.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering US history and government for the NY Regents Exam will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn US history and government. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding the beginning of the war, Thomas Paine's Common Sense and the Treaty of Paris
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning history (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about the American Revolution for the NY Regents Exam
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra history learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the NY Regents - The American Revolution Help and Review chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the American Revolution chapter exam to be prepared for the NY Regents Exam.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any American Revolution-related question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in an American Revolution unit of a standard US history course. Topics covered include:

  • The Second Continental Congress
  • The Declaration of Independence
  • British Loyalists vs. American Patriots
  • The leadership of George Washington at Trenton, Saratoga and Valley Forge
  • The Battle of Yorktown

12 Lessons in Chapter 2: NY Regents - The American Revolution: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

1. Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

Following the Boston Tea Party, Massachusetts was placed under the command of the British army. Rumors of a rebellion led to an attempted raid on the militia's arsenal. The events that followed at Lexington and Concord touched off the American Revolution.

The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

2. The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

1763 marked the beginning of the long road to revolution for the American colonies. By 1775, military actions had finally erupted. How were the colonists and their leaders going to respond?

The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

3. The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

After 12 years of tension and fighting, the colonists and their leaders were ready to declare themselves a new country, independent of Great Britain. This lesson examines the motives, the text, and the legacy of America's Declaration of Independence.

British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

4. British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

In this lesson, learn about the difficult decisions faced by individuals as the American Revolution erupted. Would you have been a Loyalist or a Patriot? Are you sure about that?

George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

5. George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

After a series of setbacks in 1776, George Washington's leadership of the Continental Army helped America turn the tide of the war in three pivotal locations, prompting France to recognize the United States as a nation and an ally.

The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

6. The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

After the unsuccessful Southern Strategy, General Cornwallis pulled his army up to Yorktown, Virginia. A combined effort by the armies and navies of America and France resulted in British surrender and the 1783 Treaty of Paris that recognized the United States of America.

John Paul Jones: Biography, Facts & Quotes

7. John Paul Jones: Biography, Facts & Quotes

John Paul Jones was the first naval hero of the American Revolution. His success against a superior British Fleet helped build him a international reputation as a great naval tactician.

The Battle of Lake Erie in 1813: Summary & Facts

8. The Battle of Lake Erie in 1813: Summary & Facts

The Battle of Lake Erie was a pivotal event in the War of 1812. Read all about this historical event through a summary and fact set and then complete a short quiz to see what you learned.

The Constitutional Convention: Delegates & Purpose

9. The Constitutional Convention: Delegates & Purpose

The Constitution of the United States is considered a living document, changing and growing since its ratification in 1787. Yet, the fundamental principles that it is based on have remained solid. This lesson will describe the Constitutional Convention, the meeting in which the U.S. plan for government was debated and created.

The Embargo Act of 1807: Summary & Facts

10. The Embargo Act of 1807: Summary & Facts

This lesson will cover the Embargo Act of 1807. We will focus especially on the Act's definition, its background and purpose, its specific provisions, and its outcome.

The Hartford Convention of 1814: Definition, Summary & Resolutions

11. The Hartford Convention of 1814: Definition, Summary & Resolutions

When Federalists met in Hartford, Connecticut, in December 1814, they meant to protest the War of 1812. What they managed to do, however, was effectively destroy their own party as a national political force, through a combination of bad timing and bad luck.

Two Treatises Of Government by Locke: Summary & Explanation

12. Two Treatises Of Government by Locke: Summary & Explanation

John Locke's ideas about government and human nature became the starting point for modern political theory and, ultimately, the American Revolution. Locke's concepts of freedom, law, and the purpose of government were foundational to the modern conception of democracy.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support