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Ch 3: NY Regents - The US Government in 1776-1800: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The US Government in 1776 - 1800 chapter of this NY Regents Exam US History and Government Help and Review course is the simplest way to master the US government during that period for the NY Regents Exam. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn essential information about the US government from 1776 through 1800.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering US history and government material for the NY Regents Exam will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn US history and government. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding the Ratification of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights or the Preamble to the Constitution
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning history (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about the US government (1776 - 1800) for the NY Regents Exam
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra history learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the NY Regents US Government (1776 - 1800) Help and Review chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the US government chapter exam to be prepared for the NY Regents Exam.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any US government in 1776-1800 question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a US Government (1776-1800) unit of a standard early American history course. Topics covered include:

  • Creating constitutions in the individual states after the American Revolution
  • The Constitutional Convention
  • The Articles of Confederation
  • George Washington and the new government in the United States
  • Battle of Fallen Timbers

19 Lessons in Chapter 3: NY Regents - The US Government in 1776-1800: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Creating State Constitutions After the American Revolution

1. Creating State Constitutions After the American Revolution

After the revolution, the states had to figure out what the rule of the people would be like. The early state constitutions and how they were drafted would inform the process and the resulting document that would become the U.S. Constitution.

The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

2. The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

The Articles of Confederation was the new nation's founding document, but the government established under the Articles was too weak. The new central government had no way of raising revenue and no ability to enforce the commitments made by the states. The Northwest Ordinance paved the way for the growth of the new nation.

Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion

3. Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion

The Articles of Confederation were too weak to create an effective government for the new nation. In this lesson, discover how Shays' Rebellion proved that the national government needed to strengthen.

The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

4. The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

The Constitutional Convention was intended to amend the Articles of Confederation. Instead, those in attendance set out to found a republic (the likes of which had never been seen), which is still going strong well over 200 years later. To accomplish this task, compromises had to be made. The Great Compromise designed the bicameral congress the U.S. has today.

The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

5. The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

The U.S. Constitution may be one of the most important documents in history, but it wasn't a sure thing. A lot of debate took place. There were many people passionate about ratification, and many people passionate about ensuring it didn't get ratified. The divide over the Constitution shows us the root of political parties in the U.S.

The US Constitution: Preamble, Articles and Amendments

6. The US Constitution: Preamble, Articles and Amendments

The U.S. Constitution is one of the most important documents in history. It establishes the government of the United States, and its first ten amendments, the Bill of Rights, assures every U.S. citizen the rights we have all come to hold dear.

The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

7. The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

The Bill of Rights was pivotal in getting the U.S. Constitution ratified. More importantly, the Bill of Rights guarantees the rights of every citizen of the United States in a way that is nearly unequaled.

George Washington and the New United States Government

8. George Washington and the New United States Government

George Washington was the United States' first president. He knew everything he did would set the stage for future presidents of the country. A heavy weight was on his shoulders, and much of what he established in his two terms set the precedent for presidents today.

Hamilton and the Federalists vs. Jefferson and the Republicans

9. Hamilton and the Federalists vs. Jefferson and the Republicans

Although President Washington warned against the nation falling into political factions, the different views of the Constitution held by Alexander Hamilton and the Federalists and Thomas Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans set the path for the two-party system that the U.S. has today.

The Whiskey Rebellion and Battle of Fallen Timbers

10. The Whiskey Rebellion and Battle of Fallen Timbers

In the early days of the U.S., President Washington and the new government were tested by foreign and domestic issues. How these issues were dealt with would establish the young nation's position. Domestically, the Whiskey Rebellion and the Battle of Fallen Timbers demonstrated how rebellion and territorial issues would be decided.

President John Adams: From Alien and Sedition Acts to XYZ Affair

11. President John Adams: From Alien and Sedition Acts to XYZ Affair

John Adams was an important founder of the United States. In many ways, he was the voice of the Revolution. As president, he had some proud shining moments and one major blight on his legacy.

Separation of Powers: Definition & Examples

12. Separation of Powers: Definition & Examples

Separation of powers is the distribution of political authority within a government. Learn more about how separation of power works in the United States, then check your understanding of this topic with a quiz.

The New Jersey Plan: Explanation & Supporters

13. The New Jersey Plan: Explanation & Supporters

The New Jersey Plan was one option as to how the United States would be governed. The plan called for each state to have one vote in Congress instead of the number of votes being based on population. This was to protect the equality of the states, regardless of population size.

Massachusetts Constitution of 1780

14. Massachusetts Constitution of 1780

In this lesson we explore the Massachusetts Constitution of 1780. Written by three renowned figures in colonial history, the constitution is considered a precursor to the U.S. Constitution written seven years later.

Shays' Rebellion: Definition & Summary

15. Shays' Rebellion: Definition & Summary

Every day across the United States, homeowners that have been affected by the recession are having their homes foreclosed on. Their only option is to figure out a way to pay off their debt in a timely manner or vacate their homes. In the 1780s, several farmers decided to take a stand against the government foreclosing on their homes and farms. Learn here about Daniel Shays and the rebellion he led.

The XYZ Affair: Definition, Summary & Significance

16. The XYZ Affair: Definition, Summary & Significance

This lesson discusses the XYZ Affair. Learn more about the breakdown in diplomatic relations between the United States and France at the end of the 18th century, and then test your knowledge with a quiz.

What is the Alien Act of 1798? - Definition & Overview

17. What is the Alien Act of 1798? - Definition & Overview

The Alien Act of 1798 was a part of the larger Alien and Sedition Acts passed by the Federalists in Congress. It gave the president the authority to deport aliens based solely on his judgment.

Annapolis Convention of 1786: Definition & Overview

18. Annapolis Convention of 1786: Definition & Overview

The Annapolis Convention was small and did not actually achieve what it was initially designed to do. However, this convention was still an incredibly important step towards creating our current system of government. Read this lesson to find out more!

The Trent Affair of 1861: Definition & Summary

19. The Trent Affair of 1861: Definition & Summary

The Trent Affair involved a Union admiral removing two Confederate diplomats off a British ship. The affair ended without incident, though it created a serious diplomatic crisis for Lincoln during the American Civil War.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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