Ch 4: NYSTCE English Language Arts: Literary Genres

About This Chapter

Get organized for your NYSTCE English Language Arts test. Short, user-friendly video lessons and quizzes can aid your review of various genres of literature so you are prepared to correctly answer questions on this subject on the exam.

NYSTCE English Language Arts: Literary Genres - Chapter Summary

What are the differences between prose and poetry, or fiction and nonfiction? Explore the elements of various genres of literature in preparation for the NYSTCE English Language Arts test. This chapter of our online study guide includes the following lesson topics:

  • Defining prose and using foreshadowing and character
  • Understanding nonfiction
  • Fiction types
  • The fable, folklore, myth and legend
  • Epistolary writing: letters and diaries
  • Understanding and analyzing drama
  • Contemporary Young Adult fiction
  • Poetry
  • Form and meaning in poetry
  • Approximate rhyme

You can experience the types of multiple-choice questions you might encounter on the test by taking the quick quizzes after each lesson. They can also alert you to any areas that might need more attention.

NYSTCE English Language Arts: Literary Genres Objectives

The subarea of your test that pertains to the fundamentals of literature composes about 22% of the exam. In addition, the written, constructed-response assignment that constitutes ten percent of your test also assesses many of the same objectives. Review the following in preparation:

  • Characteristics and significance of folk literature and mythology
  • The understanding of genre as a means of evaluating the merits of literature
  • Elements of fiction
  • Characteristics of legends, fables, fantasies and realistic novels
  • Types of drama
  • Dramatic structure
  • Types of nonfiction
  • Comparison of fiction and nonfiction
  • Organization in nonfiction works
  • Evaluating nonfiction
  • Poetry: formal rhyme schemes, poetic techniques, stanza structures and poetic meter
  • Narrative poetry
  • Patterned lyric poetry
  • Adolescent literature: genres, topics and themes

You'll answer approximately 90 multiple-choice questions over the course of the exam, in addition to writing your constructed-response assignment. We can help you review all the objectives listed above, so that you can be ready when test day arrives.

12 Lessons in Chapter 4: NYSTCE English Language Arts: Literary Genres
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Genre? - Definition & Types

1. What is Genre? - Definition & Types

Genre is a French word that means sort or style. It is often used to classify different types of art. In this lesson, we will define genre, learn why it's important and look at how genres evolve over time.

What is Prose? - Finding Meaning in Foreshadowing & Character

2. What is Prose? - Finding Meaning in Foreshadowing & Character

This literature lesson will teach you the difference between prose and other writing. You'll also learn how to analyze characters and foreshadowing to better understand the author's intentions, theme, and underlying meanings.

What Is Nonfiction? - Definition & Examples

3. What Is Nonfiction? - Definition & Examples

There are a wide variety of genres of literature, but most can be separated into two categories. Watch this video lesson to learn about one of those categories: nonfiction.

Types of Fiction: Novels, Novellas & Short Stories

4. Types of Fiction: Novels, Novellas & Short Stories

Learn how fiction is organized by length into three categories: novels, novellas and short stories. Explore the general characteristics of each type, and learn about some famous examples.

The Fable, Folktale, Myth, Legend: Differences and Examples

5. The Fable, Folktale, Myth, Legend: Differences and Examples

In this lesson, learn about fables, folktales, myths and legends, stories that entertain and serve instructive or educational purposes. Discover how these types of stories differ from one another and about their prevalence throughout the world.

Epistolary Writing: Letter and Diary Forms

6. Epistolary Writing: Letter and Diary Forms

In this lesson, you will discover that prose writing can take on different formats, from letters and diary entries to newspaper clippings and interviews. Explore how writers of both non-fiction and fiction tell stories through these different forms.

What is Drama? - Terms, Time Periods and Styles

7. What is Drama? - Terms, Time Periods and Styles

Ever wonder why we use the word 'drama' when referencing people who overreact to a situation? Discover the definition of drama, its different styles, and why your friends might belong on the stage in this overview of the dramatic genre.

Analyzing Dramatic Works: Theme, Character Development & Staging

8. Analyzing Dramatic Works: Theme, Character Development & Staging

If 'All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players,' then why does analyzing a dramatic script seem so difficult? Find out how to make analyzing dramatic works easier with a four-step process in this video lesson.

Contemporary Young Adult Fiction: Topics, Themes & Place

9. Contemporary Young Adult Fiction: Topics, Themes & Place

Young adult literature has grown and expanded in the last 50 years. In this lesson, you'll learn about the topics, themes, and places that appear in young adult fiction, and you'll have a chance to test your understanding with a short quiz.

Poetry as Literary Form: Overview and Examples

10. Poetry as Literary Form: Overview and Examples

This lesson will introduce the formal qualities of poetry and the ways that it differs from prose. Among other things, we'll consider meter, rhyme schemes, stanzas, and popular poetic forms.

Form & Meaning in Poetry

11. Form & Meaning in Poetry

In this lesson, we will explore how form and content combine to create meaning in poetry. Along the way, we will examine the components of poetic form and content and define poetic meaning.

Approximate Rhyme: Definition & Examples

12. Approximate Rhyme: Definition & Examples

This lesson focuses on words or phrases that sound the same, or rhyme. Approximate rhyme is defined, and examples show how it differs from exact rhyme.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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