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Ch 19: NYSTCE English Language Arts: Evaluating & Delivering Speeches

About This Chapter

Learn more about the art of delivering speeches and acquire techniques for evaluating them when you study this chapter's videos. Afterwards, you could be better prepared for relevant questions on the NYSTCE English Language Arts examination.

NYSTCE English Language Arts: Evaluating and Delivering Speeches - Chapter Summary

Enhance your ability to deliver and evaluate speeches by reviewing the information in this chapter. The videos explain what it means to listen and outline the main stages of the listening process. Critical and creative thinking are emphasized, and the correlation between group size and effective listening are explored. Useful applications for similes, analogies and metaphors are described. Prior to taking the NYSTCE English Language Arts examination, improve your capacity to:

  • Identify the four stages of listening
  • Engage in divergent thinking
  • Implement critical, active, empathetic and selective listening skills
  • Use vividness and clarity to attract an audience
  • Analyze speakers and evaluate their presented arguments
  • Discover the purpose and importance of visual aids during speeches

When you're preparing to sit for the NYSTCE English Language Arts examination, these lessons can strengthen your existing understanding and familiarize you with concepts you may not have known. Enjoy unlimited access to the videos, which are available online 24/4. Use your mobile technology or a desktop computer to review the above topics. If you have questions, submit them to the expert instructors for assistance. Video tags permit you to jump from one main topic to another, written transcripts include bold related terms and the lesson quizzes test your retention.

NYSTCE English Language Arts: Evaluating and Delivering Speeches Chapter Objectives

The Speaking and Listening section of the NYSTCE English Language Arts examination may test your understanding of techniques for effectively delivering and evaluating speeches. Worth 9% of the whole examination, the section's ten selected-response questions will evaluate how well you can evaluate a speaker's reasoning, tone and stance. All in all, there are 90 selected-response questions on the computer-based examination along with one constructed-response item. The time for completion is three hours and 15 minutes.

6 Lessons in Chapter 19: NYSTCE English Language Arts: Evaluating & Delivering Speeches
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Four Stages of the Listening Process

1. The Four Stages of the Listening Process

As messages are sent to us, it seems as though we simply hear and react, but there is actually a process that our brains use to process the information. It begins with attending, then interpreting, responding and finally remembering the information.

Listening Effectively in Groups: Critical, Selective, Active & Empathetic Listening

2. Listening Effectively in Groups: Critical, Selective, Active & Empathetic Listening

Being an effective listener allows relationship building and leads to increased productivity in the workplace. To form an environment for effective listening, you need to know the best group sizes and the four types of effective listening.

Critical Listening & Thinking: Evaluating Others' Speeches

3. Critical Listening & Thinking: Evaluating Others' Speeches

Critical listening skills go far beyond just hearing a speaker's message. They involve analyzing the information in a speech and making important decisions about truth, authenticity and relevance. Learn about critical listening and thinking skills in this lesson.

Analytical Intelligence, Divergent Thinking & Creativity

4. Analytical Intelligence, Divergent Thinking & Creativity

Some people tend to think more analytically, while some are creative thinkers by nature. Is creativity an important skill for solving problems? In this lesson, we'll learn the differences between creative and analytical thinking and discover ways to nurture creative thinking.

Using Vivid Language in Public Speaking

5. Using Vivid Language in Public Speaking

A speech should not bore the audience. To captivate your audience and command their attention, the use of vivid language is necessary. This includes using clarity, rhythm and vividness to get your audience to pay attention to your speech.

Visual Aids in Public Speaking: Importance, Purpose, and Audience Considerations

6. Visual Aids in Public Speaking: Importance, Purpose, and Audience Considerations

Giving a speech can be nerve-wracking, and it might seem easy to just skip the visual aids. In this lesson, we'll discuss why that's a bad idea, why visual aids are important, and what elements make a great visual aid.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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