Ch 13: NYSTCE English Language Arts: Revising & Editing Texts

About This Chapter

Prepare for the English Language Arts Test of the New York State Teacher Certification Exam. Use these short, video lessons with quick quizzes to review revising and editing techniques.

NYSTCE English Language Arts: Revising and Editing Texts - Chapter Summary

Revisit the strategies for editing content and proofreading to weed out grammar or spelling errors. Practice writing organized essays containing clear sentences and strong arguments. All of the following topics are included in this chapter of our online study guide for the NYSTCE English Language Arts exam:

  • Editing and proofreading your writing
  • Writing logical sentences and avoiding faulty comparisons
  • Using idioms and phrasal verbs
  • Writing clear sentences
  • Using sources in evaluating and writing
  • Structuring sentences in essays
  • Identifying grammatical errors
  • Peer editing

Watch the videos, practice the writing strategies and take the quizzes for immediate feedback. Then, go back over any topics that might need more attention.

NYSTCE English Language Arts: Revising and Editing Texts Objectives

The portion of your exam allocated to writing and editing comprises about 22% of the test. You can expect to see questions analyzing your understanding of these objectives:

  • Removing redundancy, wordiness, clichés, run-on sentences and lack of clarity from sentences
  • Reorganizing sentences to group related ideas
  • Removing sentence fragments, dangling modifiers and misspellings
  • Changing nonstandard punctuation or capitalization
  • Using accepted styles for documentation of sources
  • Understanding word-processing technologies for text revision
  • Understanding both self- and peer-editing strategies

Your test will include 90 selected-response items. It will also include a written, constructed-response assignment that constitutes ten percent of the exam. The organizing, editing and revising techniques that you practice through this chapter of our online study guide can serve you well as you edit for the final draft of your piece.

11 Lessons in Chapter 13: NYSTCE English Language Arts: Revising & Editing Texts
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Edit and Improve Essay Content

1. How to Edit and Improve Essay Content

Going back through an essay that you've written in order to make substantive content improvements can be a daunting task. Fortunately, there are some basic principles that you can apply to whip your essay into shape.

How to Proofread an Essay for Spelling and Grammar

2. How to Proofread an Essay for Spelling and Grammar

Proofreading is the last step in revising an essay - don't skip it! A single typo can sometimes ruin the hard work of an entire paper. This lesson will help you find the right proofreading strategy for you.

How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

3. How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

Your sentences may not always make as much sense as you think they do, especially if you're comparing two or more things. It's easy to let comparisons become illogical, incomplete, or ambiguous. Learn how to avoid making faulty comparisons on your way to writing a great essay.

Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

4. Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

Just because you know a good sentence when you read one doesn't mean that you think it's easy to put one together - forget about writing an essay's worth. Learn how to write clear sentences and turn rough ones into gems.

How to Use Sources to Write Essays and Evaluate Evidence

5. How to Use Sources to Write Essays and Evaluate Evidence

When writing an essay, you will often be asked to utilize appropriate sources for evidence, including facts and definitions. In this video, we will talk about the ways we can utilize and evaluate sources and evidence.

How to Structure Sentences in an Essay

6. How to Structure Sentences in an Essay

Sometimes we know what we want to write, but we are just unsure of the best way to write it. In this video, we will cover ways to structure sentences in an essay.

How to Write Better by Improving Your Sentence Structure

7. How to Write Better by Improving Your Sentence Structure

Often times in writing, we know what we want to say, but it doesn't seem to come out right. In this video we will learn the steps needed to improve your writing with better sentence structure.

Identifying Subject-Verb Agreement Errors

8. Identifying Subject-Verb Agreement Errors

It's important that the subject and verb in every sentence agree in number. While it's often easy to make this happen, there are a few situations in which it can be tricky to achieve subject-verb agreement. This lesson explains how you can be sure to pair the right verb with a subject.

Identifying Errors of Verb Tense

9. Identifying Errors of Verb Tense

In order to identify verb tense errors, you'll need to learn about the six verb tenses and how they differ. Once you know how to look for them, problematic shifts in verb tenses can be spotted and avoided easily.

Identifying Errors of Singular and Plural Pronouns

10. Identifying Errors of Singular and Plural Pronouns

It's sometimes not completely clear at first whether a singular or plural pronoun is necessary in a sentence. This lesson covers those confusing situations and explains how to be sure that you're using the right pronoun.

Peer Editing: How to Edit Essays By Other Writers

11. Peer Editing: How to Edit Essays By Other Writers

Alfred Sheinwold once said, 'Learn all you can from the mistakes of others.' A great way to improve your own writing is by editing the writing of others - especially when you have to find the not so obvious mistakes. That is what we will be learning in this lesson - how to edit the work of other writers. The biggest benefit will be in helping you avoid those same mistakes in your own writing.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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